“I don’t care what you say…the Jets aren’t coming to Baltimore and winning.”

November 22, 2013 | Drew Forrester

By this time next Friday, the shape of the Ravens and their playoff run will be in full bloom.

If they win both, that gives them a great chance to sneak in somehow, pending a successful December and/or some assistance from others in the AFC.

Given that both games — Sunday vs. the Jets and Thursday night vs. the Steelers — are in Baltimore, you have to like the chances of John Harbaugh’s team over the next six days.

Pittsburgh stinks.

So do the Jets.

And, yes, the Ravens are a 4-6 team, I know that…and their record indicates “we stink”, too.

But when two stinky teams meet up, the team stinking at home usually wins.  See this year’s Bills/Ravens and Browns/Ravens games, for example.  Or that Ravens/Steelers game in Pittsburgh back in October.

The Ravens aren’t losing at home on Sunday to a woeful offensive bunch like the New York Jets.

I realize the New York defense is pretty good, which could pose problems for a Baltimore offense that struggles to put together four good quarters of activity on the same Sunday, but unless that Jets defensive unit can shut out the Ravens, I can’t see any way possible Rex Ryan leaves Baltimore with a smile on his face late Sunday night.

The Jets won’t reach the end zone on Sunday.  Ravens win in a semi-laugher, 23-9.


Peter Angelos donated $2.5 million to Franklin Square Hospital earlier this week.

His name is attached to several buildings in Baltimore now, a noble gesture from any citizen, no matter how much money you have in the bank.

I’ve said this for a long time now and it will always be worth repeating a few times a year.

Peter Angelos has, in my opinion, not been a very good owner of the Orioles since 1993.  Even today, mostly removed from the day-to-day doings of the organization, his stewardship can be questioned if only by virtue of some of the people employed by him in the team’s front office.  That said, Angelos has done a lot of good for the “non-baseball” community over the last twenty years with donations and financial assistance provided to numerous organizations that make Baltimore a better place.  It’s a shame his good deeds haven’t been publicized the right way by “his people”.

We all might understand Peter Angelos better if, in fact, he was willing to admit he’s a lot more like the rest of Baltimore than he’s evidently willing to admit.