Five former Eagles headed to Coppin Hall of Fame

January 30, 2013 | WNST Staff

BALTIMORE – The Coppin State department of athletics announced today its second Hall of Fame class. The six Hall of Fame members will be honored at a ceremony from 7-8 p.m. in Baltimore at the Forum Caterers on Friday, Feb. 1. The Hall of Fame class will also be honored during halftime of the Coppin State-Norfolk State men’s basketball game on Saturday, Feb. 2 at the Physical Education Complex.

 

The Hall of Fame class of 2013 includes men’s basketball coach Joseph Jones, men’s basketball coach Cyril Byron, men’s basketball player Colbert Carter, men’s basketball player Tony Carter, men’s basketball player Warren Hayman and men’s basketball player James Camphor.

 

“These men are being inducted for not only their playing and coaching careers at Coppin State, but for their enormous contributions to the community,” said director of athletics Derrick Ramsey. “We take great pride in honoring and recognizing the special talents displayed by our Hall of Fame members during, and after, their time at Coppin State.”

 

Joseph Jones was the head men’s basketball coach at Coppin State from 1965-70. He led the Eagles to their first-ever conference championship in 1967-68 when Coppin State captured the Potomac Intercollegiate Conference title. A Baltimore native, Jones taught at Coppin State from 1965-85 and retired as the Head of the Department of Health, Physical Education and recreation in 1985. He earned his bachelor of science degree from West Virginia State in 1950, his master’s degree from New York University in 1961 and his doctorate from Maryland in 1973. Jones served in the United States Army and retired as a United States Army Reserve warrant officer. He later joined the Maryland State Guard and retired with the rank of Full Colonel. He also had a book published, Requiem for an Ugly Man.

 

Cyril Byron served as the head men’s basketball coach and athletic director at Coppin State. He spent 23 years at Coppin State where he served as the Chairman of the Science and Mathematics Department, Dean of Education and the President of the Faculty Senate. He later served as an administrator at the Community College of Baltimore from 1976-1985. Byron was the athletic director and the Associate Dean of the Division of Natural Sciences, Health and Physical Education. Prior to his time in the academic world, Byron proudly served his country as a member of the United States Army Air Force 99th fighter squadron, the first, and at the time the only, black Air Force unit. The 99th fighter squadron is popularly known as the Red Tails.

 

Colbert Carter enjoyed an outstanding four-year career at Coppin State from 1969-72. A Baltimore city native, Colbert was recruited to Coppin State by Dr. Joseph Jones. He played two seasons for Dr. Jones and two for Charles Hardnett. He earned All-Potomac Intercollegiate Conference Honors in 1969, 1970 and 1971. He helped lead the Eagles to a Potomac Intercollegiate Conference championship in 1972. Following his career at Coppin State, Carter earned an invitation to the Baltimore Bullets summer camp. Carter earned his degree in education from Coppin State and taught in the Baltimore City Public Schools and in Charles County. He became the department chair for special education and held that position until his retirement in 2006. He also served as an assistant coach in football, track and field and basketball. He was the head basketball coach at LaPlata High School from 1982-98 where he earned several coaching honors from the county and the Southern Maryland Athletic Conference.

 

Tony Carter ranks as one of the greatest offensive players in Coppin State history. He played at Coppin State in the 1975-76 and 1976-77 seasons and helped lead the Eagles to the 1976 NAIA National Championship. He, along with Joe Pace, were named to the NAIA All-Tournament team. During his two seasons in a Coppin State uniform the Eagles posted a combined record of 71-5. He ranks fourth all-time in scoring at Coppin State with 1,585 career points. His career scoring average of 22.0 ranks second all-time at Coppin State and his 894 points scored during the 1975-76 season is the most scored by any player in a single season. Additionally, he was named the Potomac Intercollegiate Conference Player of the Year in 1977 and owns the official school record for points in a game with 46 against Bowie State.

 

Warren Hayman was a three-year letterwinner for the men’s basketball team from 1961-63. He earned All-Mid-Atlantic Intercollegiate Conference honors following his senior season in 1963. Hayman received his bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Coppin State, his master’s in math education from Stanford and his doctorate in education from Harvard. A career educator, Hayman served in a variety of roles in his 42 years in education including a public school superintendent in California, dean of the School of Education at Coppin State and an Education Policy Fellow at the United States Department of Education. He is a recipient of numerous awards and honors including the Coppin State Vision award, Baltimore County NAACP Excellence in Education Award and the Phi Beta Sigma Education Award.

 

James “Winky” Camphor played four seasons of basketball at Coppin State from 1948-51. An original Eagle, Camphor holds the unofficial school record of 50 points in a game against Cheyney in 1950. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Coppin State in 1951 and his master’s degree from Coppin State in 1957. He has a distinguished career following his graduation from Coppin State. He has earned the National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education Distinguished Alumni Award, State of Maryland Faithful Citizen award, National Association for Sickle Cell Outstanding Member Award, State Department of Mental Health and Hygiene Service Award, City of Baltimore Citizen’s Award, National Federation of the Blind Service Award, Children’s Cancer Center Volunteer Award, Heart of Love Award, Emmanuel C.C. Church Living Legends award and the Harlow Fullwood Award.

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