Tag Archive | "harbaugh"

FlaccoBulldogNestor

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dear Joe Flacco: I’ll never let ‘em forget how “elite” you were here in Baltimore

Posted on 17 March 2019 by Nestor Aparicio

Dear Joe:

As I told you when I tossed you a text five minutes after you were traded to the Denver Broncos last month, it was going to take me a little while to process it all and write an appropriate “exit” letter as you graduate on from the Baltimore Ravens and become a guy who is annually “in our way” whilst trying to win the next few Super Bowls.

Over the past few years, I have made it no secret that you are my all-time favorite Baltimore sports athlete. Oh, sure, others have Brooks or Cal or Ray – and I know and greatly respect those arguments and can make them myself – but you will forever be my No. 1 guy for a myriad of reasons both personal and professional that I will finally make public here upon your less-than-flattering departure.

As my WNST partner Brian Billick always likes to point out: “When you win a Super Bowl, they say they can never take it away from you. But that doesn’t stop them from trying…

Perhaps it’s the underdog Dundalk guy and Horatio Alger fire burning within me that admires you so much but your story has been my lifetime favorite to watch unfold and cover as a Baltimore sports fan who has had the pleasure to get to know you better than most since that fateful day in April 2008 when you became the “next quarterback up” after so many broken promises not named Trent Dilfer or Earl Morrall.

And, as you know, I’ve seen them all since the early 1970s and professionally since 1984. Marty Domres. Bert Jones. Art Schlichter. Mike Pagel. And all of the purple branches of the wilted, lavender Vinny Testaverde tree that you learned about upon your arrival.

Through all of the years and all the sports, you are my favorite story – the underdog, Division Not One quarterback who came down from Philly via my Aunt Clara’s hometown of Newark, Delaware and her beloved Blue Hens and delivered Baltimore a Super Bowl parade.

Joe, unless you go out to Denver and find the fountain of Kurt Warner, you’re not going to Canton for a bust measurement so that’ll always be the first knock on you because you’re not a Hall of Famer. And, of course, these last six years of not qualifying for January or winning enough postseason games that no longer made the Ravens believe in you as a franchise quarterback – in name, salary or depth chart – at 34 years old.

Oh, sure, last week there were heartwarming videos from Owings Mills that made the room dusty as your trade became official. And between now and whenever they bring you and your family back after you’ve acquired more silver on your temples and chin, you’ll have an afternoon to address Baltimore again whenever they immortalize you in the Ravens’ Ring of Honor.

But I wanted to wait to see what a press conference would look like with you in another uniform before I inked this farewell tome. I must say, with zero shock, that it looked just like the ones in Owings Mills except for the orange and blue horse and John Elway (as you know, an original Baltimore “Satan” from the history book of Irsay and the Colts) standing next to you.

John Elway says you’re entering your prime.

The Ravens made a teary-eyed video after benching your ass and trading you for a 4th-round draft pick.

From your point of view, let’s skip the formalities and talk Street Philly  – your profane language of choice, which makes me love you even more – for what really happened. They believed in you so little last April that they drafted your replacement, you got hurt midway through another potential playoff year and then you were never heard from again. They wasted no time in throwing your expensive ass outta here. Even though they loved you, they believed you were overpriced, and the “sell by” date on your carton expired sometime around 2017. They never called you “washed up” – but the Baltimore Ravens didn’t believe in you anymore and the world watched it unfold every time John Harbaugh praised Lamar Jackson at the podium after another

Comments Off on Dear Joe Flacco: I’ll never let ‘em forget how “elite” you were here in Baltimore

download (1)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Random Ravens Thoughts 12-26-18

Posted on 26 December 2018 by Dennis Koulatsos

Just a couple of weeks ago the Baltimore Ravens were given around a 4% chance of making the NFL playoffs, and lo and behold now here they are on the doorstep of not only getting in by beating the Cleveland Browns, but also in great position to win the division and earn a home playoff game.

One of the funny things – and believe you me, there’s no shortage of funny things surrounding this team right now – is the notion locally and nationally that this team can’t win with this “gimmicky” offense.  It reminds me of back in the day when Ray Lewis and the Ravens faced Miami with their version of a gimmicky offense which came in the form of the Wildcat formation.  After easily disposing of the Dolphins, Lewis quipped “that no matter what, it’s still football.”

What the 1st ballot Hall of Famer was talking about is that no matter how you scheme it up, it still comes down to blocking and tackling. It still comes down to one on one matchups. It’s a simple game.  Win those matchups, win the game.  And that is exactly what the Ravens are doing, right now.

Chargers’ coach Anthony Lynn said as much after the post game rubble he was standing in that the Ravens had left.  He said they got outplayed and got outcoached.  The most noteworthy thing he said was that the Chargers didn’t see anything from the Ravens that they hadn’t seen before, and that they hadn’t seen anything that they weren’t expecting.  It was all right there, on film, on the field, right in front of them.  They simply couldn’t stop them.

That’s the beauty of the current edition of the Baltimore Ravens.  They run a very simple offense, and they execute the heck out of it.  It’s just a handful of plays, disguised by different sets and multiple players in motion.  It causes linebackers, safeties and cornerbacks to pause and look to see where the ball is, often confused by where the ball is going.

Defenses are built on read and react principles, and they are having a hard time of doing just that against the Ravens.  Much has been made that mercurial rookie QB Lamar Jackson forces defenses to play 11 on 10 football, versus the traditional 11 on 11.  It puts a tremendous amount of pressure on them.  If they key in on Jackson too much, then bruising backs Gus Edwards and Ken Dixon gain chunk yards between the tackles.  Focus on the backs, and they risk Jackson going around the end for big gains.

And then there’s the play action passes, when Jackson pulls the ball out and surveys the field.  It is truly rare to see a rookie QB with his eyes downfield, but Jackson has done this since day one.  That’s a skill that takes some time to develop, and lots of QBs never develop it.  In terms of Jackson’s future and continued growth, the fact that he has this skill in spades bodes well for him as well as the organization.

Jackson has developed good rapport with all of the receivers, particularly Willie Snead and Mark Andrews.  He’s also shown the ability to deliver crisp, on target passes across the middle. That’s where most interceptions in the NFL occur.  It’s usually late throws across the middle, and Jackson thus far has excelled in that area.

Of course pundits are quick to point out that Jackson is prone to put the ball on the ground, but he also recovers about 70% of those fumbles.  He’s also shown a penchant for shaking off not only fumbles and interceptions, coming back to make big plays.  His short term memory in regards to making mistakes also serves him well.

The Ravens have a big time game coming up against the Browns, who are also on a hot streak right now.  I watched their last game, in which they disposed the Jeff Driskell led Bengals in a workman like fashion.  It wasn’t much of a game, as the Browns dominated in every phase. It looked to me like the Bengals had packed it in for the season.

It was also a home game for the Browns, and they had that going for them.  Baker Mayfield looked good at times and like a rookie QB at others.  He made some gains with his feet, buying some time to find open receivers as well as tucking the ball in and taking off with it downfield.  He is barely 6 feet tall and he had a couple of passes batted down.

His frequent  targets were WR Rashard Higgins and TE David Njoku.  Jarvis Landry and Breshad Perriman also contributed but to a lesser extent.  Nick Chubb is a handful at running back, and that’s the one player I am sure that the Ravens defense will focus on taking away.  Chubb and Njoku are the keys to that offense, and who the Ravens defense needs to pay particular attention to.

Much of the credit for the Browns’ dramatic turnaround this season not only goes to their interim head coach Gregg Williams, but to their offensive coordinator Freddie Kitchens.  His offense has been very creative, productive and overall fun to watch.  Kitchens has done such a good job, that his name is emerging as a head coach candidate for many of the jobs that are going to be open at the end of the season.

He uses RB Duke Johnson very creatively in the run and pass game, as well as Jarvis Landry and Breshad Perriman.  In fact, Landry threw a bomb to Perriman on a double reverse.  But going back to what Ray Lewis had said, it’s still football.  The Ravens have to stay discipline, the ends have to stay at home and set the edge, and they will be fine.

As far as the Browns’ defense is concerned, the Bengals had some success running between the tackles with Joe Mixon.  The Browns are 24th in the league against the run, so the Ravens should have continued success running the ball against them.

Back to Baker Mayfield.  At the end of the game versus the Bengals, as he was running off of the field he stared down Hue Jackson for what seemed like an eternity.  It wasn’t exactly a good look for him, and it showed that he still has some immaturity issues that have haunted him throughout his college career.

It’s still early but it looks to me that not only have the Ravens selected the better quarterback, but more importantly the better person.  These two have some history going back to 2016, as Jackson beat Mayfield and Deshaun Watson for the Heisman Trophy.  That one still burns Mayfield for sure, and you can bet he’s going to be fired up to end the Ravens’ season this Sunday.

I would be remiss if I didn’t address coach John Harbaugh and his status with the Ravens.  I thought that Friday’s 7:00 p.m. announcement by the team that he is going to coach the Ravens through 2019 while they mutually worked on a contract extension was brilliant.  Whether they do or not at this point is irrelevant.  Lots of people questioned the timing of the announcement, but I thought it was great.

It accomplished two things.  First, I thought it was a good way to double focus the team the day before a big away game with the Chargers.  It told them that if they had any doubt about Harbaugh and his coaching staff to just get it out of their minds.  More importantly it sent a message to the veteran players that they – not Harbaugh – were playing for their jobs.  They didn’t have to worry about the incoming coach – they had to worry about the current one, not only for this year but the next and even well into the future.

Respected sports journalist Peter King – among others – is still skeptical in regards to Harbaugh’s return to Baltimore as head coach in 2020.  He is of the opinion that Harbaugh – who gets a raise in 2019 and will make in the $8 million range – will play out his contract and see what his options are in 2020.

I certainly don’t share King’s opinion.  John Harbaugh is a smart man, but the Ravens are also a smart organization.  I cannot imagine a scenario where Harbaugh is a lame duck coach next year.  The Ravens will make it a boy or a girl.  It will be one or the other.  Either he signs a long term contract, or they will trade him to a team and receive as much compensation for him as possible.

Harbaugh will agree to that for a number of reasons.  For starters he would be the hottest head coach on the market.  He would be clearly the number 1 candidate on almost any teams’ wish list – this year.  Who knows what the market will be next year and who’ll be available?  Coach will strike while the iron is hot, and he should.

I believe that Harbaugh wants to stay in Baltimore and I believe the owner and front office want to keep him.  The only reason I can see stopping it from happening is if there is additional power that Harbaugh would demand over personnel decisions.  That could end negotiations.  And if that happens, I believe the Ravens would leak out word to the rest of the league that Harbaugh is available, and would seek to trade him to a team they would receive maximum compensation from in the form of draft picks.

That aside, here’s to a victory over the Browns and a long playoff run.  The Ravens have a shot to write history.  It is a long shot, but winning a Super Bowl with a rookie quarterback would be one for the ages.  They have experience, defense, special teams, running game, coaching and momentum to get there.

I don’t know if truly any teams fear them and don’t want to face them, but I do know that they are going to be an awfully tough out.  If in fact they beat the Browns and get into the Super Bowl tournament, history tells us that anything can happen.

 

Comments Off on Random Ravens Thoughts 12-26-18

Flacco

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chapter 20: Sup-Harb Bowl – A Crescent City Crowning for Ravens

Posted on 31 January 2018 by Nestor Aparicio

 

 

 

“We want to win Super Bowls. We want to make history. We want to do things that have never been done in the NFL before. Don’t we all want that in life? Don’t we all have dreams?”

John Harbaugh on WNST.net (March 2008)

 

 

 

 

 

THE NFL ALLOWS THE TWO TEAMS that win their conference championship game an extra week to prepare for the Super Bowl. For the Baltimore Ravens, it was just what the commissioner ordered – a few days to rest and enjoy their monumental accomplishment. Despite the need to prepare to beat the San Francisco 49ers, the Ravens were in dire need of a little time to breathe after what had been a physical and emotional roller coaster over the previous 21 days.

The Ray Lewis Last Ride. Beating the Colts. A new offensive coordinator. New personnel on both sides of the ball over three games. The brutal cold in Denver. The drama in Denver. The miracle in Denver. The emotions of Denver. And then the exorcising of some old demons in Foxborough, beating Tom Brady and overcoming the role of being a huge, road underdog two weeks in a row in the biggest games of their lives. It was indeed time to rest.

Sure, the Ravens were lucky to win in Denver. But statistically, and if not for shoddy coverage on the two Trindon Holliday returns for touchdowns, the Ravens played extremely well on offense and defense at Mile High. But it was in New England, where they fell behind early and took no mercy after halftime, that they showed true championship mettle. The Ravens beat the snot out of the Patriots in the second half on both sides of the ball. Flacco ran the offense up and down the field, and the Ravens defense held Brady scoreless in the second half. “When is the last time that happened at Foxboro?” said center Matt Birk. “Like, never? It’s unbelievable!”

But it was Flacco and the offense that put the pedal down and attacked the banged-up and depleted Patriots defense. “We realized that we just needed to put some pressure on them in that way,” Flacco said after the game in the Gillette Stadium locker room. “In the first half we were probably a little bit run-heavy, and they did a good job of stopping it, and we came out in the second half and decided to go with what we went with. We didn’t come all the way here to play it safe and hope to win. We came here to win the AFC Championship Game, and you have to play to win and you have to do some of those things, and our guys made plays – Anquan [Boldin] came up huge – all of our receivers [and] all of our tight ends, our linemen, everyone came up big when they needed to. We’ve definitely overcome a lot, but I think that – if you look at the Super Bowl winners over the past few years – I’d probably say that we’d have a lot in common with that. It’s about who can get ready and who can become their best at the right time and hit the ground running and that’s what we’re doing.”

The Ravens wouldn’t need to run to New Orleans. Like Fats Domino sang, they could’ve walked or floated with the emotional high they were on after New England.

The Big Easy would be waiting in seven days, and even though the strategy on the field would take a backseat to the Super Bowl media madness and storylines, the Ravens knew they had their hands full with upstart quarterback sensation Colin Kaepernick and his hard-to-mark “Pistol” offense. San Francisco also prided itself on a stingy defense led by a head coach that Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh knew all too well.

And as much as John Harbaugh begged the media to not delve to deeply into this unique story of brother vs. brother, he knew there was no stopping that train.

Let’s just cut that right out,” Harbaugh joked with the media from the podium immediately following the win in Foxborough. “Can we all agree? Just forget about that stuff. We did that last year, OK? It was fine. It got old last year. Did it not? My dad is definitely on board with that. [My parents] don’t take any interviews anyway. He’s in the basement down in Mequon [Wisconsin], and I hope he’s on his fourth or fifth beer

Comments Off on Chapter 20: Sup-Harb Bowl – A Crescent City Crowning for Ravens

11001803_10200488974943825_24341778461735493_n

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chapter 1: Meet the new boss, not the same as the old boss

Posted on 12 January 2018 by Nestor Aparicio

 

Proverbs 29:18 says: ‘Where there is no vision the people perish.’ I guess that’s why I feel like we stuck to the vision and the team grew into it.”

— John Harbaugh (March 2013)

 

IT WASN’T EXACTLY A RESTFUL sleep for Baltimore Ravens head coach Brian Billick on the night of Dec. 30, 2007, but the 27-21 home victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers earlier that evening snapped a dismal nine-game losing streak to end the season on some semblance of a bright note and his agenda for beginning 2008 was clear after a disastrous 5-11 finish in a season that was steeped in promise with a 4-2 start.

Earlier that week, Billick sat for hours with Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and General Manager Ozzie Newsome, as he frequently had, reviewing and evaluating the state of the Baltimore Ravens roster and future. After the final game with Pittsburgh, he visited emeritus owner and founder Art Modell in his box at the stadium feeling good about defeating the Ravens’ arch rival and snapping a nine-game losing streak to finish 2007 with a modicum of success and a hint of some future achievement.

The long, exhausting season was over, but while December 31, 2007 wasn’t officially 2008 just yet, Billick’s sleep deprivation had to do more with future planning than a future canning. He had repeatedly been told his job was safe during the agonizing losing streak and the team’s public relations machine moved earlier in the month to announce publicly that Billick wasn’t going to be fired. He was “safe.” Plus, he was only concluding the first of a four-year, $24 million contract he signed after the 2006 Ravens went 13-3, but suffered a tough loss to the Indianapolis Colts during the playoffs.

Yet, on what is always known around the NFL as “Black Monday” for its many coaching staff firings, many sports media outlets were still speculating about the state of Billick’s job security.

At 8:40 a.m., during a 25-minute phone call, he was insistent that his job security was, well, secure. Billick was always candid, always painfully honest and up-until-this-point, always “in the know” when it came to the state of the Ravens. Over the previous nine years, his integrity, honesty and information had been in his words “unfiltered” — meaning the unvarnished truth.

At 10:10 a.m. the internet and local sports world exploded with multiple reports that Brian Billick was out as the coach of the Baltimore Ravens.

The shots heard round Owings Mills were not only unexpected by Billick, but by most of the media, many members of his coaching staff, and everyone else in the organization who reasoned that the three years left on his contract — still damp with just 11 months of tread on it and $18 million more of Baltimore Ravens’ owner Steve Bisciotti’s money guaranteed — made him amongst the safest coaches on the continent.

Sure, the Ravens had a bad year amidst a sea of injuries and another season of dreadful quarterback play with a broken down Steve McNair, an overmatched former Heisman Trophy winner in Troy Smith and the unfulfilled potential of 2003 first-round draft pick Kyle Boller, but firing a decorated coach was certainly a major risk (and expense) for Bisciotti.

Newsome was powerless and only became aware of Bisciotti’s intentions hours before. This was Steve’s decision and Steve’s alone.

The head coach who had led the Baltimore Ravens to the playoffs in four of his nine seasons and a 2001 Super Bowl title was unceremoniously fired and suddenly an NFL head coaching job was now available, where only moments before there was a franchise with a clear leader and a clear direction that had

Comments Off on Chapter 1: Meet the new boss, not the same as the old boss

clifton

Tags: , , , , ,

Clifton Brown dissects the 2-7 Baltimore Ravens

Posted on 17 November 2015 by WNST Staff

clifton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments Off on Clifton Brown dissects the 2-7 Baltimore Ravens

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

HOLIDAY VIP DEAL: Buy “Purple Reign 2” for Ravens readers here

Posted on 05 December 2014 by Nestor Aparicio

Thanks for checking our section of purple cyberspace and for having interest in purchasing Purple Reign 2: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story via WNST.net. It’s been a labor of love for me — researching, writing and presenting the building of a NFL championship.

In 2001, I wrote Purple Reign: Diary of a Raven Maniac and I’ve had many inquiries regarding reprinting it and packaging it with the new book on the 2012 Ravens. So, below are the options to purchase both books as well as a 6-CD collection of our best WNST radio interviews with the many stars and interesting people from Super Bowl XXXV and Super Bowl XLVII. It will have original audio from 1990’s with Ray Lewis, Brian Billick, Jon Ogden as well as a two-hour life retrospective when I sat down with Arthur B. Modell in 2004. We’ll also include highlights from the past two years with Joe Flacco, Ray Rice, Torrey Smith, John Harbaugh and others. It will be nearly seven hours of conversation with Baltimore Ravens who have hoisted the Lombardi Trophy.

The book is 480 pages, chock full of stories, background, behind-the-scenes information told in 22 chapters from the firing of Brian Billick to the hiring of John Harbaugh to the drafting of Joe Flacco and Ray Rice to the 2012 season and the Super Bowl XLVII win and parade down Pratt Street and celebration inside the stadium back in February.

And the best part of the book or books? They both have happy endings. If you love the Baltimore Ravens, you’ll love the book(s).

It’s the best work of my career and I know once you read it you’ll agree. Virtually every review has been a 5-star compliment since the book was released in June 2013.

Here are two links to excerpts from Purple Reign 2:

This is an excerpt from Chapter 6 of Purple Reign 2: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story.

And here’s another from Chapter 10 involving Joe Flacco and Steve Bisciotti’s cash showdown in August 2012.

 

BUY PURPLE REIGN HERE:

Here’s our shopping cart for all things Purple Reign, new and old:

Purple Reign V.I.P. Box Set (HOLIDAY DISCOUNT)

Includes:

Purple Reign 2: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story (2013)

Purple Reign: Diary of a Raven Maniac (2001) hardback 2nd edition

WNST Purple Reign Radio Memories (6 CD’s)

RAY 2:52/BELIEVE IN JOE New Orleans poster

Full color 12X18 poster of Purple Reign 2 cover (featuring fabulous artwork of local sports cartoonist Mike Ricigliano) that is suitable for autographs/framing or your mancave wall

And if you buy this deluxe package, make sure you let me know how to personalize the new book for you below:

$59.95 plus S&H

$49.95 WITH FREE SHIPPING!!!!!

How do we sign Purple Reign 2?

 

—————————————————

Purple Reign Both Books Hardbound

Includes:

Purple Reign 2: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story (2013)

Purple Reign: Diary of a Raven Maniac (2001)

$49.99 plus S&H

 

—————————————————

Purple Reign 2: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story BOOK ONLY (hardback)

$26.95 plus S&H

 

—————————————————

Purple Reign: Diary of a Raven Maniac BOOK ONLY (hardback)

$24.95 plus S&H

 

—————————————————

Purple Reign Radio Memories — a 6 CD set of WNST purple interviews with stars & heroes of Super Bowl XXXV & Super Bowl XLVII

Nearly seven (7) hours of classic audio conversations including the life story of Arthur B. Modell in his words

$19.95 plus S&H

 

—————————————————

FOR E-BOOKS AND E-READERS

Both Purple Reign: Faith, Family & Football – A Baltimore Love Story & Purple Reign: Diary of a Raven Maniac are NOW AVAILABLE:

Click here to purchase via Smashwords for most e-formats

Click here to purchase via Amazon for Kindle

 

 

 

 REVIEWS FOR PURPLE REIGN 2:

By JL
Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase
If you want to read game reviews about the 2012 Ravens, just looks online. If you want to read the story of the 2012 Ravens, if you want to relive the journey of the 2012 Ravens then read Purple Reign 2. This book cover so much history about the Ravens and is told through the eyes of Baltimore’s own award winning Journalist, Nestor Aparicio.The history of the Ravens is recapped from a fans perspective with inside information. Aparicio makes you feel as if you are in the Ravens Locker Room, draft war room and the sidelines. Ray Lewis, Joe Flacco, Ed Reed, Torrey Smith, Anquan Boldin, Art Model, Steve Biscotti, Ozzie Newsome and John Harbaugh all provide Aparicio with amazing insight and recap events of the 2012 journey in a way never imagined. A must read for all football fans.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Must have if you’re a ravens fan. August 29, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
The interviews make it all worth it. He goes into detail how some of the players were chosen in the draft. Honestly I couldn’t put the book down. You get to have a better insight and understand the different players in the team. If you’re a ravens fan, this is one book you definitely should have.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Ravens History August 19, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
Nestor gives you behind-the-curtains access of the Ravens run to the Super Bowl!!! Amazing insight to the players, coaches and owners. A must have for every Ravens fan!!!
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Kindle Edition
Nestor Aparicio is a true fan of the Ravens and his passion is what makes this book so great.. All of the “behind the scenes” moments that he describes in detail, show all of the hard work that went into this book.. A Ravens fan can open this book at any point and be captivated.. The 2012 season was a great ride and this book puts all of the pieces together.. From process of the hiring of Coach John Harbaugh to the magical win of Super Bowl XLVII, a true page turner.

Comments (5)

Tags: , , , , ,

Ravens announce Military Appreciation details

Posted on 17 July 2014 by WNST Staff

RAVENS MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY

The Baltimore Ravens will hold their annual Military Appreciation Day on Monday, July 28, coinciding with the team’s 7 p.m. open training camp practice at M&T Bank Stadium.

Approximately 3,500 special seats will be reserved for active service members and veterans who present valid military identification upon check-in at the stadium. Immediate family members of the servicemen and servicewomen are also welcome to join, with all preferred seating coming on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Additionally, those who show a valid military I.D. will be given a special edition Ravens patriotic T-shirt, while their children will receive a unique, military-themed Ravens wrist sweatband. (Gift quantities are limited.)

Though not required, members of the Armed Forces are encouraged to come in uniform.

This marks the Ravens’ seventh-annual Military Appreciation Day, an event head coach John Harbaugh instituted during his first season with the team in 2008. Harbaugh has been an advocate of the U.S. Military, with the NFL awarding him its 2013 Salute to Service Award, acknowledging exceptional efforts by those in the league who honor and support military members. (Harbaugh was also a finalist for the award in 2011.) In 2012, Army Chief of Staff General Raymond Odierno presented him with the Outstanding Civilian Service Award. Harbaugh took part in the annual NFL-USO coaches’ tour of the Middle East in 2009, has visited numerous military bases in the U.S. and abroad (including a 2014 February trip to the Middle East), has purchased school supplies for children whose parents are serving in the military and has sent care packages to troops overseas.

Since the establishment of Military Appreciation Day, an estimated 8,000 service members have enjoyed preferred seating and opportunities to meet with players and coaches each summer. Once the season begins, Harbaugh then invites wounded warriors to be his guests at every Ravens home game. A self-proclaimed history buff, during offseason team activities, Harbaugh has also taken the Ravens to Gettysburg, Pa., to learn about the Civil War.

 

Who: Active Military Members and Veterans and Immediate Family

What: Ravens Military Appreciation Day

Where: M&T Bank Stadium Training Camp Practice

When: Monday, July 28 at 7 p.m. (gates open at 5:30 p.m.)

Details: Service members should enter the stadium at Gate B. Valid military I.D. must be presented to obtain special gifts and preferred seating in reserved sections.

 

Fireworks Night

As a reminder, the July 28 M&T Bank Stadium practice, which is free and open to the public, will also showcase the Ravens’ first-ever Fireworks Night, an event highlighted by post-practice autographs for children and afireworks/laser show.

Comments Off on Ravens announce Military Appreciation details

Tags: , , , , ,

Harbaugh says pedigree as player, coaching experience reasons for Engram hire

Posted on 11 February 2014 by WNST Staff

ENGRAM HIRED AS RAVENS WIDE RECEIVERS COACH

The Baltimore Ravens have hired Bobby Engram as their wide receivers coach, head coach John Harbaugh announced Tuesday morning.

Entering his fourth-overall season of coaching, Engram spent the past two years (2012-13) as wide receivers coach at the University of Pittsburgh. He began his coaching career as an offensive assistant with the San Francisco 49ers in 2011. Prior to becoming a coach, Engram, 41, produced a 14-year playing career as a wideout with the Chicago Bears (1996-2000), Seattle Seahawks (2001-08) and Kansas City Chiefs (2009).

“When you combine Bobby’s NFL pedigree as a player and his coaching experience, you see why we’re excited to add him to our staff,” Harbaugh stated. “He comes highly recommended, he did an outstanding job at San Francisco and Pitt, and he’s an impressive person. He’ll help our receivers and our offense become better.”

In 2013, Engram guided a Pitt receiving corps that was led by true freshman Tyler Boyd, who earned second-team All-ACC honors and set school marks for receptions (85) and receiving yards (1,174) by a freshman. Both records were formerly held by current Arizona Cardinals standout Larry Fitzgerald. Senior Devin Street completed his Panthers career in 2013 after setting school marks in all-time receptions (202) and finishing third in receiving yards (2,901).

In his first season with Pittsburgh (2012), Engram guided wide receivers Mike Shanahan (62 receptions for 983 yards) and Devin Street (73-975), who each garnered All-Big East honors in the same season, marking the first such occurrence in school history.

As an offensive assistant with the 49ers in 2011, Engram was part of a team that earned its first NFC West title in nine seasons and reached the NFC Championship game.

“What an opportunity to join a team that has won, knows how to win and does all it can to make sure they continue to win,” Engram said. “I’m ready to be part of that and ready to work.”

Selected out of Penn State in the second round (52nd overall) of the 1996 NFL Draft by Chicago, Engram appeared in 176 career games (113 starts), recording 650 receptions for 7,751 yards and 35 touchdowns. He also played in nine career playoff games, including an appearance in Super Bowl XL with Seattle. He was the Seahawks’ Ed Block Courage Award recipient in 2005.

Engram is one of the most productive and decorated receivers in Penn State history. A three-time All-American and three-time All-Big Ten selection, he helped the Nittany Lions produce a 31-5 record from 1992-95. In 1994, Engram recorded 52 receptions for 1,029 yards en route to earning the inaugural Biletnikoff Award as the nation’s top receiver.

A native of Camden, S.C., Engram graduated from Penn State in 1995 with a bachelor’s degree in exercise and sport science. Bobby and his wife, Deanna, have two daughters, Bobbi and Phoebe, and two sons, Dean and Trey.

COACHING BACKGROUND

Years                  College/Pro Team                         Position
2011                    San Francisco 49ers                       Offensive Assistant
2012-13              University of Pittsburgh              Wide Receivers
2014                    Baltimore Ravens                           Wide Receivers

Comments Off on Harbaugh says pedigree as player, coaching experience reasons for Engram hire

Tags: , , , , ,

Harbaugh honored to win Salute to Service Award

Posted on 02 February 2014 by WNST Staff

Head Coach John Harbaugh, Baltimore Ravens

Salute To Service Award, Presented by USAA

 

(on winning the award) “It’s great to see everybody. This is a pretty great deal. Alec Baldwin is pretty funny. What do you think? He’s hilarious. I haven’t been the butt of any jokes yet so far, so that’s good. It’s a great honor to be associated with the award. USAA does a great job along with the NFL of supporting and encouraging military families that do so much and make so many sacrifices for all of us. I just love what the military is doing. I love what the NFL is doing to support the military. I think it’s a great cause, and I’m just proud to be a part of it. So, what do you got?”

 

(on if the Cleveland Browns will ever make it to a Super Bowl) “Hopefully not in my tenure in Baltimore. That will be the plan to keep them out of there as much as we can. But Mike Pettine is a great coach. It’s going to be a big challenge. They’ll be buckling their chinstraps up, and so will we when the time comes.”

 

(on his brother wearing eight-dollar khakis) “Actually, they’re 24 dollars, I heard. He got some kind of sale deal. I don’t know what that was. I never saw him wear khakis. I don’t think we had khakis when we were growing up. What do you say about that? What do you guys think about that? No, no comment on that? I see a couple eight-dollar khakis out there in the audience right now as a matter of fact.”

 

(on what the Ravens take from their involvement with the military) “That’s a great question. What do we take from it as a team? I tell you, we take tremendous encouragement. These guys who come out to our practice, whether they’ve served multiple tours – and women, too – or they’ve been wounded … The wounded warriors, what they’ve been through, the unbelievable positive attitude that they bring out there is just beyond belief. And you know, we can feel sorry for ourselves or think things should be going better for us. Maybe we should have won a game or got a call from an official or something like that. You get a chance to talk to these guys and what they have in mind for their future and what their plans are for themselves and their families, just overcoming incredible adversity – that’s the greatest testament for our guys that you could possibly have. It’s a better motivational speaker than you could ever bring in bringing these guys in. Great, thanks.”

Comments Off on Harbaugh honored to win Salute to Service Award

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Harbaugh says Ravens “have a profile in mind” for next Offensive Coordinator

Posted on 15 January 2014 by WNST Staff

COACH HARBAUGH ON NEW OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR; QUOTES ON JIM CALDWELL

John Harbaugh on hiring a new offensive coordinator: “We will be interviewing coaches inside and outside of the building. We’re confident that whether we select someone currently on our staff or from another team, we will have a coach that best fits what we want to be, where we want to go and understands what Ravens football is all about. I have a profile in mind, and we are excited about the coaches who have shown interest in the job. One of the positives with the change is that we’re reminded that this franchise – and team – is attractive to many in the profession. We will have a coaching staff that will get the most out of our players.”

John Harbaugh on Jim Caldwell: “We are all so happy for Jim. He deserves this opportunity, and I congratulate the Lions for selecting him. We’re disappointed that we’ve lost Jim. We were looking forward to making progress on offense with Jim leading the charge as coordinator. Jim is a teacher, he is honorable, he is a respected leader, and every person with the Ravens will miss him. Players and assistants respond to him. You understand why he was named Detroit’s head coach and why all the other teams had him among the finalists.”

Ozzie Newsome on Jim Caldwell: “I believe it would be difficult to find anyone with the Ravens who is more respected than Jim Caldwell. That includes players, coaches and other staff members. He earned that because of the person he is and his extensive knowledge about football, including the keys to winning and his ability to teach all of that. Personally, it is a privilege to know him, and it was an honor to work with him. We put Jim in a difficult position a year ago when we named him offensive coordinator late in the season. All he did was help us turn our offense around, and we won the Super Bowl. He has many strengths, but one that is sometimes overlooked is his ability to bring a coaching staff together. He has already succeeded as a head coach, and he will again in Detroit.”

Joe Flacco on Jim Caldwell: “I enjoyed my time with Jim greatly. He is a man that I will always respect as a football coach, leader and a friend. Through his calming influence and extensive knowledge of the game, he was an integral part of our success over the past few years. He will be missed by me and the Ravens. I wish him the best of luck in Detroit.”

Comments Off on Harbaugh says Ravens “have a profile in mind” for next Offensive Coordinator