Tag Archive | "jason garcia"

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Sunday loss in Anaheim exposes real concerns for Orioles

Posted on 09 August 2015 by Luke Jones

Some of the Orioles’ biggest concerns were exposed in Sunday’s 5-4 extra-inning loss in Anaheim that prevented a second straight series win on the West Coast.

Much of the focus fell on the 11th inning and Los Angeles Angels outfielder David Murphy’s game-winning hit off lefty reliever Brian Matusz, but that was only part of the story.

First and foremost, a maddeningly-inconsistent offense managed just two runs over the final 10 innings at Angel Stadium of Anaheim on Sunday afternoon. After jumping on Angels starter Jered Weaver for two in the opening frame, the Orioles bats disappeared over the next four innings as the soft-tossing right-hander matched a season high of seven strikeouts in his first start since June 20.

Scoring a single run over their final five frames probably would have been enough for the Orioles to come away with a series win, but the pressure was on the Baltimore bullpen to pitch six innings on Sunday before Murphy finally hit one over left fielder David Lough’s head to plate the winning run with two outs in the 11th.

That’s what brings us to a concern that isn’t helping manager Buck Showalter rest easy in mid-August. Starting pitcher Miguel Gonzalez has been an underrated part of the Orioles’ success dating back to the second half of 2012, but the right-hander hasn’t been the same since a stint on the 15-day disabled list in June and again struggled on Sunday, allowing four earned runs and seven hits while lasting just 4 2/3 innings.

Gonzalez had gotten off to arguably the best start of his career with a 3.33 ERA in his first 12 outings of 2015 — he completed seven or more innings in five of those starts — before a groin injury sent him to the DL. Since returning to the roster on June 25, Gonzalez has pitched to an alarming 6.22 ERA in 46 1/3 innings.

On Sunday, he displayed a better-than-normal fastball clocked at 94 mph — making you conclude his problems probably aren’t related to health — but his third inning couldn’t have been more frustrating. With runners at the corners and no outs, Gonzalez struck out All-Star sluggers Mike Trout and Albert Pujols and appeared on the verge of escaping unscathed when he got to an 0-2 count on Murphy. He then grooved a high fastball over the heart of the plate that Murphy sent into the right-field stands for a three-run shot and a 4-2 lead for the Angels.

It was the latest example of Gonzalez making a poor pitch while ahead in the count after earning a reputation for having good command over his first 3 1/2 seasons.

As important as Gonzalez has been over the last few seasons, the Orioles must be growing impatient with his woes over the last six weeks. The 31-year-old has now failed to complete at least six innings in seven of his nine starts since returning from the DL — raising his season ERA to a career-worst 4.45 — and he is putting more strain on a bullpen that doesn’t need it right now.

Gonzalez has a minor-league option remaining, but the best candidate to take his place, right-hander Tyler Wilson, was reportedly scratched from his Sunday start for Triple-A Norfolk with an oblique issue. Showalter and the Orioles will likely lean on Gonzalez’s track record a little longer, but the right-hander must pitch better than what he’s shown throughout the summer.

Even after Gonzalez’s rough day, the Orioles were still right there in the bottom of the 11th, but the decision to activate Rule 5 pick Jason Garcia from the DL and the undermanned bullpen it’s created materialized in a crucial spot. With only Matusz, the seldom-used Garcia, and closer Zach Britton remaining in the bullpen — you could argue Showalter should have gone to his closer despite it being a tie game — Showalter elected to have his lefty specialist intentionally walk Trout and Pujols to load the bases with two outs for the lefty-hitting Murphy.

That strategy was the correct one with Matusz in the game — lefties were hitting .129 against him while righties had a .304 average entering Sunday — but it would have been nice to have had the option of going to a Tommy Hunter or a Mychal Givens against Pujols in that spot instead of loading the bases. The new void in the bullpen is magnified by the recent struggles of Chaz Roe, who gave up the leadoff double to Carlos Perez that became the winning run.

No, a series loss in Anaheim doesn’t cripple the Orioles, but it did expose some of their biggest concerns.

The Orioles could not have anticipated Gonzalez’s problems over the last several weeks, but going with a weaker bullpen is their own choice.

That combination — along with another inconsistent performance by the offense — hurt them in a winnable game on Sunday.

And sitting five games out of first in the American League East and three games behind the second wild-card spot, they can’t let too many more opportunities slip through their fingers.

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Orioles activating Garcia puts unneeded strain on bullpen

Posted on 06 August 2015 by Luke Jones

Maybe the 22-year-old Jason Garcia blossoms into an All-Star closer one day.

The Rule 5 pick possesses a high-90s fastball and a promising slider, but future upside is all he offers now as the Orioles entered Thursday 5 1/2 games behind the first-place New York Yankees in the American League East and only a game back of the second wild card. It creates another hole in the bullpen after executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette justified last week’s puzzling trade of Tommy Hunter as a way to create a spot for the talented Mychal Givens, who was optioned back to Double-A Bowie to make room for Garcia on Thursday.

In 13 2/3 innings with Baltimore earlier this year, Garcia pitched to a 5.93 ERA and walked 11 batters before being sent to the disabled list with right shoulder tendinitis in mid-May. The right-hander posted a 4.20 ERA, 14 strikeouts, and nine walks in 15 innings for Bowie during his rehab assignment, which expired on Thursday. The right-hander must spend at least 90 days on the active roster in order to lose his Rule 5 status for next season, meaning the Orioles couldn’t simply wait to activate him until Sept. 1 when rosters expand.

Not only does it reinforce the mixed signals stemming from the Hunter trade that felt more like a salary dump instead of a move to improve a club in the midst of a playoff race, but it’s fair to question whether Garcia’s upside is even worth it in the end.

The Orioles bullpen currently houses Darren O’Day, Brad Brach, and Chaz Roe, who were all obtained for little cost. O’Day was a waiver claim after the 2011 season, Brach was acquired for little more than a spare part in the minors two winters ago, and Roe was inked to a minor-league deal last December.

For an organization showing an ability to find impact relievers seemingly out of nowhere for cheap, is it prudent to essentially play a man down in the bullpen for the next 3 1/2 weeks?

Yes, it’s unlikely that manager Buck Showalter will even entertain the thought of using Garcia in a close game, but T.J. McFarland — or anyone else the Orioles might recall in his place if and when there’s a need for a fresh arm — now moves up the pecking order. The lefty and former Rule 5 selection sports an unhealthy 1.83 WHIP (walks and hits per inning pitched) in 15 1/3 innings this season.

The trickle-down effect might lead to more strain on the Orioles’ most reliable relievers and could even cost the club a game or two at some point, which is an uncomfortable margin for error in a tight race.

As was the case with the Hunter trade, this may not end up hurting the Orioles down the stretch, but it very well could, making the decision fair to question.

That’s why many fans are once again scratching their heads over a club that traded for a rental outfield upgrade a week ago and is aiming for a third trip to the postseason in four years.

This move may not be a big deal, but it makes contending harder than it needs to be.

You just hope Garcia’s upside is ultimately worth it.

 

 

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Orioles call up hard-throwing Givens from Double-A Bowie

Posted on 20 June 2015 by Luke Jones

The Orioles made a series of roster moves prior to the second game of a three-game set with the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday afternoon.

As expected, right-handed pitcher Kevin Gausman was activated from the 15-day disabled list to make his first start of the season, but the Orioles also added a fresh arm to their bullpen by selecting the contract of right-handed pitcher Mychal Givens from Double-A Bowie. Right-handed pitchers Mike Wright and Tyler Wilson were optioned to Triple-A Norfolk to make room on the 25-man roster.

Originally drafted as a shortstop in 2009, the 25-year-old Givens has impressed manager Buck Showalter and other members of the organization this year with a mid-90s fastball from a three-quarters arm slot that has led to a 1.60 ERA, 12 saves, and 54 strikeouts in 39 1/3 innings. With Wilson having thrown 78 pitches in relief after Wright lasted just 1 1/3 innings on Friday night, Baltimore wanted more length in its bullpen against the highest-scoring offense in the major leagues.

To make room on the 40-man roster for Givens, the Orioles placed right-handed pitcher Jason Garcia (shoulder) on the 60-day disabled list.

With Wright turning in his worst performance of the season on Friday, it’s unclear when he will receive another opportunity in the Baltimore starting rotation. After pitching 14 1/3 scoreless innings in his first two major league starts last month, the 25-year-old right-hander has allowed 17 earned runs in 15 1/3 innings over his last four starts.

Meanwhile, Wilson continues to impress as he’s pitched to a 2.12 ERA in 17 innings for the Orioles this season.

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Orioles hoping Wright can provide boost in bullpen

Posted on 13 May 2015 by Luke Jones

BALTIMORE — With Kevin Gausman still on the 15-day disabled list and slated to once again be stretched out as a starter, the Orioles have elected to turn to right-hander Mike Wright for help in the bullpen.

The 25-year-old was recalled from Triple-A Norfolk on Wednesday after Rule 5 pitcher Jason Garcia was placed on the DL with right shoulder tendinitis. He doesn’t figure to receive many high-leverage opportunities early, but the Orioles would like to have another power arm in the bullpen as Wright’s sinking fastball projects to sit in the mid-90s pitching in relief.

“There’s a lot of good options down there. It could be a short time; it could be a long time,” manager Buck Showalter said. “We felt like he would be here at some point. He’s another one that we think has a bright future for us, but it’s still the biggest jump in sports. You never know how that’s going to play.”

Wright doesn’t receive the same attention as top pitching prospects Dylan Bundy and Hunter Harvey, but the 2011 third-round pick has been on the Orioles’ radar for the last couple years as manager Buck Showalter has periodically mentioned how he fared pitching in the minors. Despite underwhelming results for much of the 2014 season at Triple-A Norfolk, Wright excelled in his final seven starts when he posted a 0.95 ERA in 47 2/3 innings.

The 6-foot-6 right-hander followed that with an impressive spring for the Orioles, pitching to a 2.70 ERA with eight strikeouts in 6 2/3 innings of Grapefruit League action. Wright owned a 3-0 record with a 2.64 ERA in his six starts for the Tides this season, which included 30 strikeouts and nine walks in 30 2/3 innings.

In addition to his fastball, Wright possesses a solid slider, a changeup, and a curveball. While many project Wright to be a fringe starting pitcher in the majors, his velocity and pitch repertoire would appear to give him a reasonable chance to carve out a long-term relief role at the very least.

Whether Wright is ready to make meaningful contributions to the 2015 Orioles remains to be seen, but his body of work at Norfolk and in the spring warranted the opportunity he will now receive.

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An Orioles performance only a mother could love

Posted on 10 May 2015 by Luke Jones

There was something ironic about the Orioles turning in a performance only a mother could love in a 6-2 loss to the New York Yankees on the holiday Sunday.

In their fifth loss in six games, the Orioles struck out a club-record 18 times as Michael Pineda turned in the first 16-strikeout performance without a walk in the majors since Johan Santana did it in 2007. To be clear, the Yankees starter deserves plenty of credit as he lowered his season ERA to 2.72, but Baltimore’s frustration was evident throughout the afternoon, perhaps captured best in the fifth inning when Manny Machado slammed his bat in frustration after striking out.

Despite Sunday’s dubious achievement, the strikeout hasn’t been a universal problem for the Orioles — they entered the day ranked 15th in the majors — but Chris Davis struck out twice more on Sunday to give him a league-leading 48 in 116 plate appearances. Davis has managed to produce an .805 on-base plus slugging percentage with a club-leading seven home runs, but his contact rate of 61.9 percent entering Sunday was even lower than last season’s 63.6 percent, which doesn’t bode well for future performance.

Hoping to build on back-to-back quality starts, Bud Norris reverted to the pitcher we saw throughout spring training and most of April when he allowed four earned runs before being chased in the fourth inning. It would be unfair to ignore his last two outings in which he posted a 3.95 ERA over 13 2/3 innings, but the leash is shrinking rapidly as we approach Memorial Day.

Of course, the question of who would replace Norris was complicated with Kevin Gausman being placed on the 15-day disabled list with right shoulder tendinitis on Friday. Injuries are a cruel reality of the game, but it’s impossible not to wonder what role irregular work might have played in the most talented pitcher in the organization developing a cranky shoulder. It was one of the biggest concerns mentioned as a reason why some wanted Gausman to be working on a regular schedule in the starting rotation at Triple-A Norfolk if not pitching every fifth day in Baltimore.

The day also brought the latest cringe-worthy outing from Rule 5 pitcher Jason Garcia, who walked four batters and allowed an earned run in 2 1/3 innings. His performance mattered little to the final score, but the 22-year-old has now walked 11 batters in 13 2/3 innings and once again was sitting in the low 90s with his fastball, a far cry from the electric stuff club officials raved about as enough reason to try to carry him on the 25-man roster.

There are simply too many pitchers — Mike Wright, Tyler Wilson, and Steve Johnson, just to name a few — performing well at Norfolk to justify continuing the Garcia experiment if he can’t even pitch in mop-up situations. And his diminished velocity makes you wonder if the long-term payoff of keeping him in the organization is even worth it.

The corner outfield spots continue to create cause for concern as right fielder Delmon Young threw to the wrong base to allow a run to score in the fourth inning and left fielder Alejandro De Aza got a bad read on Jacoby Ellsbury’s two-run double. Even with a proper break, De Aza likely wouldn’t have caught the deep liner, but Orioles pitching simply doesn’t strike out enough hitters to survive with the spottier-than-usual defense we’ve continued to see over the first five weeks of the 2015 campaign.

Even the 2013 Gold Glove winner Machado has struggled to find his usual consistency in the field with a club-leading seven errors this season.

On top of his shaky defense, De Aza struck out twice more to drop his average to .211 with a .632 OPS. He has the second-worst strikeout rate on the club behind Davis, but he hasn’t provided near the production to justify much playing time.

De Aza and Steve Pearce (.556 OPS) were counted on to be consistent contributors in 2015, but both have struggled to even stay in the lineup with such disappointing numbers. Their struggles have provided plenty of ammunition to criticize an offseason in which Nelson Cruz and Nick Markakis departed via free agency and only Travis Snider was added to the outfield.

The Orioles return home 13-16 and 5 1/2 games behind the first-place Yankees in the American League East. Panic and hopelessness are still premature, but it’s fair to be concerned with Baltimore having already suffered separate losing streaks of five and four games in the season’s first five weeks.

As manager Buck Showalter would say, blaming the underwhelming start solely on the losses of Cruz, Markakis, and lefty reliever Andrew Miller — who still has a 0.00 ERA in New York — would be a convenient excuse to overlook other problems. The Orioles have received poor pitching performances from Norris and No. 1 starter Chris Tillman and not nearly enough offense from the likes of De Aza and Pearce as well as former All-Star shorstop Everth Cabrera prior to the recent return of J.J. Hardy.

There’s no such thing as must-win games in mid-May, but the Orioles now play 17 of their next 20 games at Camden Yards. To quell concerns and keep pace as the geriatric Yankees continue to play strong baseball, the Orioles would serve themselves well to take advantage of the home cooking after a brutal stretch on the road.

They can start by putting an ugly Mother’s Day behind them as quickly as possible.

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Five questions pondering Perriman, Orioles bullpen, others

Posted on 01 May 2015 by Luke Jones

Every Friday, I’ll ponder five topics related to the Ravens or Orioles (or a mix of both).

Five questions …

1. Is it just me or has Central Florida quietly produced some quality NFL players in the last 20 years? Not exactly known as a college football powerhouse, the Knights have played at the Division I Football Bowl Subdivision level for just under two decades, but their list of NFL players includes the likes of Brandon Marshall, Daunte Culpepper, Kevin Smith, Asante Samuel, Blake Bortles, and Mike Sims-Walker. First-round pick Breshad Perriman became the third former UCF player on the Ravens’ current roster, joining wide receiver Kamar Aiken and offensive lineman Jah Reid. Of course, Baltimore can only pray that Perriman works out a lot better than Reid, who has been a major disappointment as a third-round pick in 2011.

2. Is it just me or is Steve Pearce quickly becoming the new Melvin Mora? As if Friday’s opener as the “home” team at Tropicana Field wasn’t strange enough, the Orioles started Steve Pearce at second base for the first time in his professional career — majors or minors. Fielding questions aside, it’s a creative way to get Pearce in the lineup as he’s essentially been supplanted by the hot-hitting Jimmy Paredes over the last two weeks. Through the first 21 games of the season, Pearce has now started at five different spots — both corner outfield positions, first base, designated hitter, and second base. If you’re wondering what could be next, Pearce has also appeared at third base in his major league career and once at shortstop in the minors. That versatility is just another reason why Buck Showalter likes having Pearce on his roster, especially if his bat can heat up to 2014 levels.

3. Is it just me or do the Ravens always seem to land a high-value player in the second round? Baltimore clearly needed to add a tight end with Dennis Pitta’s future unclear and Owen Daniels now in Denver, but few would have expected Minnesota’s Maxx Williams to still be on the board when general manager Ozzie Newsome moved up just three spots to grab him at 55th overall. It hasn’t worked out perfectly every year in terms of results, but Torrey Smith (2011), Arthur Brown (2013), Timmy Jernigan (2014), and Williams (2015) were all players linked to the Ravens in at least a few first-round mock drafts before Newsome ultimately nabbed each one in the second round. Pretty strong value.

4. Is it just me or do the Orioles have too many attractive bullpen options at Triple-A Norfolk to waste much more time on the Jason Garcia experiment? Showalter offered an honest assessment of the Rule 5 pick last homestand in noting that his velocity has dropped from the spring, perhaps a sign of the organization having second thoughts about continuing to keep him on the roster. A peek at Norfolk might expedite that conclusion with a finally-healthy Steve Johnson posting a 0.73 ERA with 18 strikeouts in 12 1/3 innings this season. The Tides starting rotation also sports options with Mike Wright (2.29 ERA), Zach Davies (1.25 ERA), and Tyler Wilson (3.86 ERA) leading the way. Garcia has a 6.97 ERA and 8.61 FIP (fielding independent pitching mark), numbers so poor that you must ask if his potential ceiling is worth keeping him on the roster of a contending club.

5. Is it just me or does the NFL need to pick up the pace in announcing draft picks? One of my biggest pet peeves over the last few years is how easily the television presentation falls behind the pace of picks actually being turned in by the teams. Commercial breaks are unavoidable, but it becomes excessive when the announcement of a selection is delayed while the networks blabber on about something unrelated to what’s happening in real time. The NFL has effectively transformed the draft into a three-day marathon, but can we at least announce the picks in a timely manner to avoid logjams like what we experienced Thursday with the news of Perriman’s selection being out there for several minutes before it was announced by commissioner Roger Goodell? The event is long enough as it is without the additional dragging of feet.

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Five questions pondering Joseph, Garcia, others

Posted on 17 April 2015 by Luke Jones

Every Friday, I’ll ponder five topics related to the Orioles or Ravens (or a mix of both).

Five questions

1. Does Caleb Joseph make it easy to wait for Matt Wieters to take his time to return?
No, I don’t expect the former to continue hitting .375, but it’s difficult to argue how good his defense has been as Orioles pitching posted a 3.00 ERA with him behind the plate in 2014, he threw out 40 percent of runners trying to steal, and his pitch framing rates better than Wieters’ did in either of his his last two full seasons. The question isn’t whether Joseph is better than or as good as the pre-injury Wieters — he’s clearly not — but it remains to be seen if the post-surgery Wieters will be the same defensively and whether he’ll provide enough offense to justify being the undisputed starter if he’s a shell of his old self behind the plate.

2. Does Buck Showalter need to figure out exactly what he has with Jason Garcia sooner rather than later?
I know the Orioles love the Rule 5 pick’s arm and he has nice potential at age 22, but they can’t afford to carry him if it means they essentially have a 24-man roster. If his arm is special enough to warrant keeping him, he should be able to get some meaningful outs along the way. The early-season struggles of Tommy Hunter and and the rest of the bullpen have magnified the situation, of course, but Showalter needs to be able to use Garcia in some legitimate situations, especially if he’s not going to give the Orioles length in the same way that T.J. McFarland did as a Rule 5 pick in 2013.

3. Should third base coaches take more chances around baseball?
I thought about this at different times this winter after Kansas City elected not to send Alex Gordon home as the potential tying run in Game 7 of the World Series, and the question returns with Orioles third base coach Bobby Dickerson drawing the ire of fans with some questionable sends at the start of the season. Historically, a runner standing on third base with two outs will score only 27 percent of the time, but data shows only five percent of runners being sent home from second base on a single with two outs are thrown out at the plate. Yes, that success rate looks great, but how many potential runs are ultimately being stranded at third base to avoid the chance of a runner being thrown out in favor of the potentially lower-percentage chance of the next batter driving him in. Of course, there are many variables involved such as the speed of the runner, the location of the ball, and the arm strength of the fielder, but it’s still interesting to ponder how many potential runs are lost due to the fear of failure and the criticism that a third base coach can face.

4. Is the exuberant friendship between Manny Machado and Jonathan Schoop a joy to watch?
I first watched these two play together when they were at Single-A Frederick in 2011, and it’s scary to think how young both still are with so much untapped potential. Of course, scenes like this don’t hurt, either:

5. Do we still not appreciate Jim Palmer enough? The Hall of Fame pitcher celebrated the 50th anniversary of his major league debut Friday and he continues to remain a fixture on Orioles telecasts five decades later. As someone who only remembers Palmer the broadcaster, I marvel at his numbers, which included a period of nine times in 10 years from 1969-1978 in which he posted an ERA below 3.00 and at least 4.1 wins above replacement. His 211 complete games, 53 shutouts, and four seasons of 300 or more innings are numbers we don’t even see in video games today.

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Clevenger, Garcia make Orioles’ 25-man roster for Opening Day

Posted on 05 April 2015 by Luke Jones

In a unique position with a surplus of pitching and Chris Davis having one game remaining from last year’s 25-game suspension, the Orioles have elected to keep 14 pitchers on their 25-man roster for Opening Day.

For now, the Orioles will keep veteran Ryan Webb and Rule 5 pick Jason Garcia in a crowded bullpen for Monday’s opener against the Tampa Bay Rays. Owed a guaranteed $2.75 million this season, Webb passed through waivers late last week and cannot be sent to the minors without his consent. Executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette would like to move him, but the Orioles would not be able to expect much of anything in return as other clubs are aware of his status.

The 22-year-old Garcia is a former member of the Boston Red Sox organization and impressed this spring, posting a 0.87 ERA with 12 strikeouts in 10 1/3 innings this spring. The right-hander underwent Tommy John surgery in 2013 and was converted to the bullpen last season.

He will need to remain on the 25-man roster all season in order for the Orioles to keep him in the organization.

In a bit of a surprising move, Mount Saint Joseph graduate Steve Clevenger made the 25-man roster as the backup catcher to Caleb Joseph, who will start in place of the injured Matt Wieters to begin the season. Many expected former Red Sox catcher Ryan Lavarnway to make the club, but Clevenger was already on the 40-man roster.

Clevenger made the club to begin last season as the backup catcher, but he was optioned to Triple-A Norfolk last May when the Orioles elected to go with Joseph and veteran Nick Hundley in Wieters’ absence. The Pigtown native hit .275 with three doubles and six RBIs in 40 at-bats this spring.

The Orioles announced Sunday that veteran Ubaldo Jimenez will make his first start of the season on Saturday, confirming that he has made the starting rotation. This leaves the 24-year-old Kevin Gausman in a relief role for now, which may create problems in finding him regular work or keeping him stretched out for a potential starting role later this season.

Davis will be eligible to return to the 25-man roster on Tuesday, leaving an interesting decision for Duquette. If the club is unable to make a trade to clear space, Webb could be released or Gausman might be optioned to Norfolk to create a roster spot.

The Orioles also announced Sunday that they had reassigned Lavarnway and outfielder Nolan Reimold to minor-league camp and optioned long reliever T.J. McFarland to Norfolk.

Wieters (right elbow), shortstop J.J. Hardy (left shoulder), outfielder David Lough (left hamstring), and infielder Jimmy Paredes (lower back) were officially placed on the 15-day disabled list to begin the year. The stints for the first three were backdated to March 27, making them eligible to return as early as April 11. Paredes is eligible to be activated as soon as April 16 after straining his lower back lifting weights last week.

Below is a look at where the roster stands for now:

STARTING PITCHERS
RHP Chris Tillman
LHP Wei-Yin Chen
RHP Miguel Gonzalez
RHP Bud Norris
RHP Ubaldo Jimenez

RELIEF PITCHERS
RHP Kevin Gausman
RHP Jason Garcia
RHP Ryan Webb
LHP Wesley Wright
LHP Brian Matusz
RHP Brad Brach
RHP Tommy Hunter
RHP Darren O’Day
LHP Zach Britton

CATCHERS
Caleb Joseph
Steve Clevenger

INFIELDERS
Everth Cabrera
Ryan Flaherty
Manny Machado
Jonathan Schoop

OUTFIELDERS
Alejandro De Aza
Adam Jones
Steve Pearce
Travis Snider
Delmon Young

DISABLED LIST (will not count against 25-man roster)
SS J.J. Hardy (left shoulder)
OF David Lough (left hamstring)
INF Jimmy Paredes (lower back)
C Matt Wieters (right elbow)

SUSPENDED LIST (will not count against 25-man roster)
1B Chris Davis

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Orioles’ Rule 5 pick Verrett claimed off waivers by Texas

Posted on 02 April 2015 by Luke Jones

Feeling the roster crunch of having too many pitchers for few available roster spots, the Orioles saw Rule 5 selection Logan Verrett claimed off waivers by the Texas Rangers on Thursday.

The 24-year-old right-hander pitched well this spring, posting a 1.93 ERA and 12 strikeouts in 14 innings of work. He was one of two Rule 5 pitchers in major league camp this spring, joining right-hander Jason Garcia.

Previously with the New York Mets organization, Verrett was the more polished of the two Rule 5 pitchers, but Garcia is considered to have more upside and could still be an option in the bullpen. In 2014, Verrett went 11-5 with a 4.33 ERA for Triple-A Las Vegas.

There had been some discussion that the Orioles might attempt to work out a trade with the Mets to keep Verrett in the organization while allowing them to option him to the minors, but he needed to pass through waivers in order for that to happen and the Rangers have been desperate for pitching help all spring.

With a crowded bullpen that will feature Zach Britton, Darren O’Day, Tommy Hunter, Brad Brach, and Wesley Wright, the Orioles are still figuring out what to do with lefty specialist Brian Matusz and right-hander Ryan Webb — both are out of options — in addition to trying to make room for Garcia. It’s possible that right-handed starter Kevin Gausman could also start the season pitching in relief, further crowding the bullpen.

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Orioles add two right-handed pitchers in Rule 5 draft

Posted on 11 December 2014 by Luke Jones

The Orioles completed their quiet week at the annual winter meetings in San Diego Thursday with the addition of two right-handed pitchers in the Rule 5 draft.

Executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette acquired pitcher Jason Garcia in exchange for cash considerations from the Houston Astros after he’d been selected fourth overall in the Rule 5 draft from the Boston Red Sox organization. The Orioles then selected right-hander Logan Verrett from the New York Mets organization.

The 22-year-old Garcia carries some intrigue as he was clocked in the high 90s while pitching in the instructional league this fall. After undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2013, Garcia went 3-2 with three saves and a 3.67 ERA in 56 1/3 innings between short-season Single-A Lowell and Single-A Greenville.

Garcia struck out 9.4 batters per nine innings and held right-handed hitters to a .189 average in 121 total plate appearances. The Orioles are expected to take a look at him as a relief pitcher during spring training, but keeping him would restrict their roster flexibility because of the need to keep him on the 25-man roster.

Originally selected by Boston in the 17th round of the 2010 amateur draft out of Land O’Lakes High School in Florida, Garcia has gone 15-16 with a 4.69 ERA in 73 minor league games (51 starts).

The 24-year-old Verrett went 11-5 with a 4.33 ERA in 28 starts spanning 162 innings with Triple-A Las Vegas in 2014. He went 28-13 with a 3.89 ERA in his three years in the Mets organization.

Verrett was originally selected in the third round of the 2011 amateur draft out of Baylor University.

The additions of Garcia and Verrett mean the Orioles currently have 39 players on their 40-man roster. Garcia and Verrett would need to remain on the 25-man roster all season.

This marks the fourth straight year that Duquette has added at least one player in the Rule 5 draft, taking infielder Ryan Flaherty in 2011, left-handed pitcher T.J. McFarland in 2012, and infielder Michael Almanzar last year.

In the minor-league portion of the Rule 5 draft, the Orioles selected outfielder and first baseman Sean Halton of the Milwaukee organization in the Triple-A phase.

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