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Baltimore Ravens running back Gus Edwards runs for a touchdown against the Houston Texans during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

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Edwards, Ravens’ historic ground game still aiming for “step forward” in 2020

Posted on 17 June 2020 by Luke Jones

The revolutionary Ravens offense rushed for an NFL-record 3,296 yards on the way to a 14-2 record last season.

Quarterback Lamar Jackson (1,206) and running backs Mark Ingram (1,018) and Gus Edwards (711) each ran for more than 700 yards. In contrast, seven NFL teams didn’t have a single 700-yard rusher in 2019.

Now adding the second-round selection of Ohio State star running back J.K. Dobbins to the mix, could the Baltimore ground game improve in 2020?

“It’s going to be difficult to do better than what we did last year with breaking the rushing record, but I think it’s a step forward,” Edwards said in a Wednesday conference call. “It’s a definite step towards that because he’s a great back and all. He’s going to make the competition that much better in the running back room.”

Consider the Ravens ran for nearly 1,000 more yards than second-place San Francisco and over 2,000 more yards than the New York Jets and Miami in 2019. Only one other team — the Michael Vick-led 2006 Atlanta Falcons — has sniffed 3,000 rushing yards in the 21st century and just 12 other teams have even eclipsed the 2,500-yard mark in a season since the beginning of the John Harbaugh era in 2008.

In other words, improving upon — or even matching — those raw numbers and efficiency will be a very tall order, especially in a sport where the passing game has been proven as the more efficient way to move the ball and score points in the long run. The record-setting pace was certainly aided by the Ravens rarely trailing last season, allowing them to lean even more heavily on the run in the second half of games. One can’t assume those multi-score leads will come quite as easily in the new season as we saw what happened when Baltimore fell behind multiple scores in the playoff loss to Tennessee.

There’s also the question about the number of carries to go around.

Even without Dobbins in the picture last season, Edwards and his shiny 5.3 yards per attempt average received just 133 carries — many in short-yardage situations — behind Ingram and Jackson in the pecking order while 2019 fourth-round pick Justice Hill only saw 58. Offensive coordinator Greg Roman’s long-held stance that you can never have too many running backs could be put to the test, especially if the Ravens have designs of Jackson and the offense taking another step forward through the air.

“Coach Roman is just committed to it. It seems like coach Harbaugh is committed to it,” said Edwards about the competition for carries. “Everybody is just throwing around a ‘four-headed monster.’ I think everybody is committed to it and really wants to do it. That’s the first step and we’ll see where it goes. I’m excited.

“It’s a chance to make history.”

It’s a great problem to have on paper, of course, but reality could prove more challenging.

Cutting down on the number of times Jackson carries the ball may make sense in the big picture, but arbitrarily redistributing some of his attempts to running backs is highly unlikely to produce the same NFL-best 6.9 yards per carry the league MVP averaged a year ago. Dobbins is an intriguing talent, but his addition doesn’t change the reality of Jackson being the transcendent force in this running game or the simple math of there being only one football.

There’s also the business side with many viewing Dobbins as the running back of the future and a signal that the 30-year-old Ingram could be a salary cap casualty next winter despite his 1,000-yard season that resulted in a trip to the Pro Bowl last year. That’s not to suggest Ingram or any other Ravens back will be anything but a team player, but the earning potential at the position is as tenuous as ever, making touches and statistics that much more important.

Entering his third season, Edwards will be a restricted free agent next year and is certainly aiming to continue making his mark after exploding on the scene as an undrafted free agent from Rutgers in the second half of 2018.

“I think that’s how I want myself to be remembered as somebody that works hard,” said Edwards, who’s averaged an impressive 5.3 yards per carry in his brief career. “That’s what the team thinks of me. I’m going to be in a great position with a great team, a team that wants to run the ball. Everything is in front of me. I just have [to take] another step forward.”

The ground game is certainly deeper and should easily remain the NFL’s best by a significant margin, but making history once again could prove difficult in more ways than one.

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bowser

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Five Ravens sleepers to watch for the 2020 season

Posted on 18 May 2020 by Luke Jones

With the Ravens now having a full 90-man roster after last month’s draft and a slew of undrafted free-agent signings, we have a better idea of what the 2020 team will look like.

Roles remain fluid, however, a point even more relevant in an unprecedented offseason limited to virtual meetings this spring. Understanding how that reality may hinder the ability of many rookies and newcomers to play a meaningful role right away, below is a look at five sleepers for the 2020 campaign:

1. OLB Tyus Bowser

An early draft pick who struggles to become a starter often finds his roster status vulnerable entering the final year of his rookie contract — Chris Wormley was the latest example of this — but the lack of an edge defender in Baltimore’s 2020 draft class was good news for Bowser. Surprisingly second on the 2019 team in sacks (five) and quarterback hits (10), the 2017 second-round pick played a career-high 401 snaps and was the top backup to Matthew Judon at strong-side outside linebacker, showing more ability to drop into coverage than other reserves on the roster. If Judon elects to skip some portion of training camp after receiving the franchise tag, Bowser could find more opportunities to solidify his roster spot and earn a larger role.

2. OL Patrick Mekari

Labeling Mekari a sleeper after he started the final six games of 2019 is a bit of a stretch, but much of the discussion in the right guard discussion has been about other veterans and 2020 draft picks Tyre Phillips and Ben Bredeson. The likes of Matt Skura, Bradley Bozeman, and Ryan Jensen developed into solid starters working with offensive line coach Joe D’Alessandris in recent years, but none found success as quickly as Mekari, who was thrown into the fire late in his rookie season. The undrafted free agent from Cal-Berkeley graded 14th among 37 qualified centers by Pro Football Focus last year and could be a viable option to start at any of the three interior spots, which is impressive for a guy no one was talking about at this time last year.

3. S DeShon Elliott

The 6-foot-1, 210-pound defensive back has been limited to just 40 defensive snaps in his first two years because of injuries, but he’s shown promise over the last two summers and the Ravens are in need of a No. 3 safety to back up starters Earl Thomas and Chuck Clark and play in certain sub packages. A 2018 sixth-round pick from Texas, Elliott will be competing with rookie seventh-round selection Geno Stone, but the former’s experience in the system should be an advantage, especially if he’s fully recovered from the season-ending knee injury he sustained in Week 6 last year. With the relationship between Thomas and the Ravens seemingly rocky, Elliott or Stone showing meaningful development this year would be a positive sign for the future.

4. RB Justice Hill 

The second-round selection of Ohio State star J.K. Dobbins wasn’t a ringing endorsement for Hill having a bigger role in 2020, but he flashed in December and impressed in his first preseason, showing the ability to break tackles despite his 200-pound frame. Hill isn’t going to become the feature back, but the 2019 fourth-round pick lined up in the slot and out wide on more snaps than either Mark Ingram or Gus Edwards last season despite playing a fraction of the time, which offers a glimpse of his potential to create matchup problems in the passing game. If the Ravens find themselves needing to play off-schedule more often in 2020, Hill finding a bigger role as a third-down back remains plausible even with Dobbins being added to the mix.

5. ILB Otaro Alaka

Last month’s selections of Patrick Queen and Malik Harrison made Alaka — a 2019 undrafted free agent from Texas A&M — an afterthought, but it was interesting to hear general manager Eric DeCosta go out of his way to mention the 6-foot-3, 239-pound linebacker in a recent conference call with season-ticket holders. After making the initial 53-man roster at the end of last preseason, Alaka appeared on his way to earning an opportunity to play on defense before a hamstring injury landed him on injured reserve in late September. Playing for an organization that’s produced the undrafted likes of Bart Scott, Jameel McClain, Dannell Ellerbe, Zach Orr, and Patrick Onwuasor at inside linebacker, Alaka remains a name to watch this summer.

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earlthomas

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Twelve Ravens thoughts following 2020 schedule release

Posted on 11 May 2020 by Luke Jones

With the NFL unveiling the 2020 regular-season schedule late last week, I’ve offered a dozen Ravens thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. What we know about the alarming incident between Earl Thomas and his wife doesn’t — and shouldn’t — provide any grounds to jeopardize his employment, but the Ravens’ terse statement made clear their disenchantment about being left in the dark. Practically speaking, a public figure’s right to privacy only goes so far.

2. The schedule release highlighted what we already knew about Baltimore being in tremendous shape from a travel standpoint with the longest trip of the season being to Houston in Week 2. Already dominant on the road last season, the Ravens should be able to continue such away success.

3. Even if one argues the Ravens are better from a talent standpoint and have a favorable schedule on paper, ESPN’s Mike Clay presented some data that should make you take pause before boldly predicting another 14-2 or better finish. What they did offensively last season just isn’t easy to duplicate.

4. With five prime-time games, four in a five-week period from November into early December, and the reigning NFL MVP, the Ravens have never carried a brighter national profile than they do right now, which is saying plenty for an organization with two Super Bowl titles in the last 20 years.

5. Asked about the center spot in a call with season-ticket holders, Eric DeCosta mentioning Bradley Bozeman was interesting, especially since left guard was seemingly the only stable interior line spot entering 2020 after Bozeman started every game there last year. Will we see three different starters inside?

6. When an elite player retires at the top of his game, speculation can persist about a comeback, but Marshal Yanda left no doubt by losing 45 pounds in two months after his final game and looking even thinner on “The Pat McAfee Show.” He looked lighter than the ex-Indianapolis punter.

7. No matter how you felt about the second-round selection of J.K. Dobbins, I don’t get the rush some have to trade Gus Edwards or Justice Hill for what would likely be an inconsequential draft pick. If more depth at running back was important, hastily diminishing the group makes little sense.

8. DeCosta acknowledged the Ravens having limited avenues to clear meaningful salary cap space without striking a long-term deal for Matthew Judon or Ronnie Stanley, who carry two of their five largest cap numbers for 2020. These negotiations and decisions won’t get any easier.

9. First-round pick Patrick Queen bought his mother a new Range Rover over the weekend. Seeing a young player fulfill his NFL dream after years of hard work and finally be able to gift a token of appreciation to a parent never gets old.

10. Asked once again — this time by a season-ticket holder and not the media — whether the Ravens were interested in signing Antonio Brown, DeCosta provided a “filibuster” non-answer that would make Dan Duquette smile.

11. With Joe Flacco undergoing neck surgery and reportedly not expected to be cleared to play until late August, you wonder if the 35-year-old has played his final snap. However, Jets general manager and ex-Ravens scout Joe Douglas “discovered” Flacco and does need a backup to Sam Darnold.

12. A personal thanks to director of player personnel Joe Hortiz for taking extensive time to conduct a virtual film session on the Ravens’ 2020 draft class and answering questions from local reporters. Such a forum offers transparency and better educates media to hopefully improve our coverage for fans.

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humphrey1

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Twelve Ravens thoughts following 2020 draft

Posted on 29 April 2020 by Luke Jones

With the 2020 NFL draft in the books and the Ravens shifting attention toward an unprecedented virtual offseason workout program, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Baltimore’s draft haul has been widely praised as it is, but Eric DeCosta also used 2020 fifth-round picks to acquire Pro Bowl selections Marcus Peters and Calais Campbell. We know many draft choices don’t pan out, of course, but the Ravens sure took advantage of value.

2. Marlon Humphrey’s fifth-year option being exercised was elementary as he’s projected to make $10.244 million in 2021, but he’s already been a team MVP and a first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selection prior to turning 24. He’s one more big year away from commanding top-of-the-market money at cornerback.

3. The career of D.J. Fluker has been pedestrian compared to first-round expectations, but his signing is a reminder of keeping expectations in check for rookies, especially without normal offseason workouts. Ideally, a young guy with a higher ceiling seizes the right guard job, but Fluker raises the position’s floor.

4. Whenever anticipating a position battle, I remember how much angst there was about the Ravens making no meaningful addition to replace right tackle Michael Oher in 2014. Rick Wagner, who had barely played as a fifth-round rookie, stepped in as an immediate upgrade for the next three seasons.

5. Speaking of competition, Jaylon Ferguson and Tyus Bowser had to be pleased to see no edge defenders taken in this draft class. Ferguson will compete to start and was in no roster danger, of course, but players like Bowser in the final year of their contract are always vulnerable.

6. J.K. Dobbins will try to break this post-Super Bowl XLVII run of second-round picks: Bowser (2017), Kamalei Correa (2016), Maxx Williams (2015), Timmy Jernigan (2014), and Arthur Brown (2013). Talk about “meh,” but I suppose the Ravens did OK trading their 2018 and 2019 second-rounders.

7. How the ground game shakes out with four running backs and the greatest single-season rushing quarterback in NFL history will be interesting — there’s only one football — but there’s no shortage of motivation. Mark Ingram was essentially put on notice and Gus Edwards and Justice Hill dropped down the pecking order.

8. Devin Duvernay will be an interesting wild card with good hands and an uncanny ability to gain yards after the catch. Considering how many screens he ran at Texas, I wouldn’t be surprised to occasionally see him lining up in the backfield and also motioning into jet sweeps.

9. After drafting exactly one wide receiver (Breshad Perriman) in the first three rounds from 2012-2018, the Ravens have selected three (Marquise Brown, Miles Boykin, and Duvernay) in the last two drafts. Somewhere, Joe Flacco shrugs his shoulders.

10. Not only is Mike Tomlin getting inside information from Maryland wide receiver Dino Tomlin, but former Terps interim head coach Matt Canada became Pittsburgh’s quarterbacks coach in January. Anthony McFarland and Antoine Brooks landing with the Steelers was hardly a shock.

11. The gap is sizable between the Ravens and the rest of the AFC North on paper right now, but Cincinnati and Cleveland had strong drafts and Pittsburgh appeared to do OK despite trading its first-round pick for defensive back Minkah Fitzpatrick last fall. Much talent was added to the division.

12. I’m not going to pretend to have any great insights into the Ravens’ reported (and unofficial) class of rookie free-agent signings, but I just hope the addition of Kennesaw State fullback Bronson Rechsteiner means his uncle shows up in Owings Mills at some point.

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Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Miles Boykin catches a pass in front of Los Angeles Rams cornerback Troy Hill during the second half of an NFL football game Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

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Five Ravens players potentially impacted most by 2020 draft

Posted on 16 April 2020 by Luke Jones

With the NFL draft just a week away, the Ravens will welcome a new batch of young talent that will impact their fortunes for 2020 and beyond.

However, many of those additions will have an adverse effect on players already on the roster, ranging from stiffer competition and fewer opportunities to a diminished role or eventual unemployment. It’s a reason why observers often say the NFL could stand for “Not For Long” with the high turnover rate of rosters every year.

The following young players wouldn’t seem to find themselves in any short-term roster jeopardy, but the outcome of this year’s draft could substantially impact their standing for the coming season and beyond:

WR Miles Boykin

Many anticipate general manager Eric DeCosta adding at least one wide receiver in the draft, but how early that selection comes could be the difference in projecting Boykin to be a starter or more of a No. 3 or No. 4 option. The 2019 third-round pick from Notre Dame flashed some big-play ability with four receptions of 18 or more yards as a rookie, but he registered just 13 catches while playing 425 offensive snaps in the regular season. At worst, the 6-foot-4, 220-pound wideout with good straight-line speed remains an attractive deep-ball option, but Baltimore using a first- or second-round pick in such a deep receiver class would likely indicate less confidence in Boykin taking a big step forward this season.

S DeShon Elliott

The 2018 sixth-round pick from Texas flashed range and physicality over his first two offseasons, but injuries have limited him to just six career games as he suffered a season-ending knee injury last October and sat out his rookie year with a broken forearm. Starting safeties Earl Thomas and Chuck Clark are under contract for the next few years, but Baltimore employed extensive three-safety packages in the second half of 2019 with ex-Raven Brandon Carr entering on the back end and Clark moving to the box. That doesn’t mean defensive coordinator Wink Martindale will do the same in 2020, but the Ravens spending a draft pick at safety over the first half of the draft wouldn’t be the best sign for Elliott.

OLB Jaylon Ferguson

A 2019 third-round pick from Louisiana Tech thrown into a starting role after the season-ending injury to Pernell McPhee, Ferguson showed growth setting the edge down the stretch and should maintain a significant role. However, the Ravens covet another edge defender to bring more juice to the pass rush opposite Matthew Judon, and Ferguson needs to diversify his technique beyond the bull rush on which he relied heavily in college. There’s a drop-off after Ohio State’s Chase Young in this draft, but there are other pass-rushing options in the early rounds who could help. Ferguson is a player who could really benefit from a normal offseason in Owings Mills, but that’s not happening with the current pandemic.

RB Justice Hill

I wrote extensively about the running back position on Wednesday, but it would be naive to assume DeCosta would pass on adding more talent and depth to the group with the ground attack being the lifeblood of Greg Roman’s offense. Hill’s 66 touches as a rookie were more a product of there being only one football to go around, but he flashed over the final couple games after the calf injury to Pro Bowl veteran Mark Ingram and could be in line for an increased share of carries in 2020. His 200-pound build doesn’t suggest his surprising ability to break tackles, but the Ravens refraining from adding a late Day 2 or early Day 3 running back would bode well for Hill’s status for the next year or two.

G Ben Powers

Replacing potential Hall of Famer Marshal Yanda is a daunting task, but the Ravens have refrained from adding a veteran so far and released reserve James Hurst last month, putting more spotlight on Powers and the draft. The 2019 fourth-round pick from Oklahoma was inactive for the first 15 games before playing an effective 30 snaps in the Week 17 finale against Pittsburgh, which isn’t a sample on which to make a confident decision. The Ravens could target an offensive tackle to move inside or Michigan’s Cesar Ruiz in the first round or look to Day 2 for an option like Ohio State’s Jonah Jackson or Temple’s Matt Hennessy, but the longer they wait would be a greater endorsement for Powers’ starting chances.

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deanthonythomas

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Ravens re-sign return specialist De’Anthony Thomas

Posted on 14 March 2020 by Luke Jones

The Ravens re-signed wide receiver and return specialist De’Anthony Thomas to a one-year deal to presumably compete for a spot in what they hope will be an improved return game for the 2020 season.

Signed to the 53-man roster in early November, the former Kansas City Chief appeared in eight regular-season games, averaging 7.2 yards per punt return and 16.6 yards per kick return. The Ravens envisioned Thomas being an upgrade to previous punt returner Cyrus Jones and kick returner Justice Hill, but he posted worse averages as Baltimore would finish 30th in the NFL in team kick return average and eighth in team punt return average. The 27-year-old drew criticism in the playoff loss to Tennessee for an unnecessary roughness penalty that pushed the Ravens back to their own 5-yard line late in the first half, a foul that preceded a 91-yard drive resulting in only a field goal.

Thomas played only three offensive snaps for the Ravens last season, carrying the ball one time in the regular-season finale against Pittsburgh. In six seasons with the Chiefs, the 5-foot-8, 176-pound receiver caught 65 passes for 509 yards and four touchdowns and ran for 190 yards and two touchdowns on 30 carries.

Despite their overall success on special teams in the John Harbaugh era, the Ravens have struggled to find explosiveness in the return game since the days of Jacoby Jones, featuring a revolving door of return men over the last five seasons.

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Baltimore Ravens running back Mark Ingram (21) scores on a touchdown run as Houston Texans cornerback Gareon Conley (22) tries to stop him during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

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How did Ravens running backs stack up to rest of NFL in 2019?

Posted on 14 February 2020 by Luke Jones

The Ravens recorded the best regular season in franchise history, but where did their individual players stack up across the NFL in 2019?

Whether it’s discussing the Pro Bowl — Baltimore had a record-tying 13 selections — or determining postseason awards, media and fans spend much time debating where players rank at each position, but few watch every player on every team closely enough to form any real authoritative opinion.

Truthfully, how many times did you watch the Tampa Bay offensive line this season? What about the Atlanta Falcons linebackers or the Detroit Lions cornerbacks?

That’s why I respect the efforts of Pro Football Focus while acknowledging their grading is far from the gospel of evaluation. I don’t envy the exhaustive effort to evaluate players across the league when most of us watch one team or maybe one division on any kind of a regular basis.

We’ll look at each positional group on the roster in the coming days, but below is a look at where Ravens running backs ranked across the NFL this past season followed by the positional outlook going into 2020:

Safeties

Mark Ingram
2019 offensive snap count (including postseason): 532
PFF ranking: eighth among running backs
Skinny: The Ravens couldn’t have asked for more in the first season of a three-year, $15 million contract as Ingram became the first Baltimore running back to rush for 1,000 yards since 2014 and was selected to his third career Pro Bowl. Not only was Ingram terrific as a rusher at 5.0 yards per carry, but he provided veteran leadership for a very young offense and excelled in pass protection.

Gus Edwards
2019 offensive snap count (including postseason): 415
PFF ranking: 29th among running backs
Skinny: The 238-pound back was always going to have a reduced role from the moment Ingram signed last March, but he still improved his yards per carry to 5.3 in his second season. Though not the well-rounded back that Ingram is, Edwards picked up a first down on 34.6 percent of his carries, easily making him one of the best short-yardage options in football last season.

Justice Hill
2019 offensive snap count (including postseason): 237
PFF ranking: n/a
Skinny: The rookie shows good speed and agility, but he saw no more than 22 offensive snaps in a game until playing 50 in the playoff loss with Ingram ailing and the Ravens down multiple scores in the second half. You’d like to see Hill get more opportunities in his second year, but there’s only one football to go around with two stout backs ahead of him and 1,200-yard rusher Lamar Jackson at quarterback.

Patrick Ricard
2019 offensive snap count (including postseason): 349
PFF ranking: first among fullbacks
Skinny: An afterthought as a healthy scratch by the end of 2018, the hybrid defensive lineman became the best pure blocking fullback in the league this past season, earning a trip to the Pro Bowl and a contract extension through 2021. Ricard’s ability to play on defense as well as to line up at fullback, tight end, or as an extra offensive lineman will continue to make him valuable to the game-day roster.

2020 positional outlook

With a record-setting offense running an NFL-high 54 percent of the time in 2019, the Ravens are always on the lookout for ways to strengthen their offensive backfield, especially if a dynamic talent slips to them in April’s draft. However, the trio of Ingram, Edwards, and Hill matched with an MVP dual-threat quarterback leaves the running game in very strong shape going into 2020. His age suggests Baltimore should keep an eye on Ingram as he enters his 10th NFL season, but this past year marked just the fourth time he’s cracked 200 carries, meaning he’s arguably fresher than the typical 30-year-old running back and also no stranger to a backfield timeshare if Edwards and Hill getting more touches proves to be optimal for 2020. The Ravens may not duplicate their NFL-record 3,296 rushing yards, but Ingram and Edwards offer a high floor, Hill brings a higher ceiling, and Jackson has the generational ability to continue making this the best running game in football by a wide margin.

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Baltimore Ravens running back Mark Ingram reacts while being introduced onto the field prior to an NFL football game against the New York Jets, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)

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Ingram returns for Ravens’ final practice before playoff game with Tennessee

Posted on 09 January 2020 by Luke Jones

(Updated: 3:30 p.m.)

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Running back Mark Ingram was back on the field for the Ravens’ final practice before Saturday’s divisional playoff game with Tennessee and is officially listed as questionable to play.

The Pro Bowl selection was suited up to practice and went through a workout that included stretching, high knees, jogging, and light running during the special-teams portion of the workout open to media. Ingram appeared to be moving well in his first football activity in front of reporters since injuring his left calf in the Week 16 win at Cleveland on Dec. 22, but what that means for his status against the Titans remains to be seen.

Head coach John Harbaugh only confirmed Ingram practiced on a limited basis after saying last Friday he expected Ingram to practice fully this week and then declining to update his status on Tuesday. An NFL Network report said the veteran back experienced some tightness in his calf at the start of the week, and offensive coordinator Greg Roman described Ingram’s status as “day-to-day” on Wednesday.

“That’s the definition of it,” said Harbaugh about Ingram being a limited participant. “We’ll see how it goes.”

The only other Baltimore player on the final injury report is tight end Mark Andrews, who was officially listed as questionable after being limited all week with a lingering right ankle injury suffered in Week 16. His status doesn’t appear to be in any question for Saturday.

Ingram wasn’t in the Ravens locker room after Friday’s practice and last spoke to reporters on Dec. 26, expressing relief at the time that he hadn’t suffered a more severe injury and confidence that he’d be ready for the Ravens’ first playoff game.

“I just did a step-back, and it just felt like somebody like kicked me or hit me in the back of my calf,” said Ingram, who was injured on the first play of the fourth quarter in the 31-15 win over the Browns. “I didn’t know if Lamar [Jackson] had cleated me when he ran by, but he didn’t. It just felt like somebody kind of popped a balloon in my calf. It was kind of scary, kind of nerve-wracking.

“You hear about that feeling a lot of times when guys do more serious stuff. I’m just happy that it wasn’t serious like that.”

Signed to a three-year, $15.5 million contract that included $6.5 million guaranteed in March, the 30-year-old rushed for 1,018 yards and 10 touchdowns on 202 carries and caught 26 passes for 247 yards and five touchdowns in 15 games. His 15 touchdowns scored tied Ray Rice (2011) for the single-season franchise record as Ingram was named to the third Pro Bowl of his nine-year career last month.

Should Ingram not be able to play in the Ravens’ playoff opener, second-year running back Gus Edwards would start in his place with rookie Justice Hill serving as the primary backup.

Meanwhile, the Titans will be without their top cover linebacker as Jayon Brown was ruled out with the shoulder injury sustained in last week’s wild-card victory over New England. His absence will hurt a Tennessee pass defense that’s already had difficulties covering tight ends this season.

Titans head coach Mike Vrabel also ruled out wide receiver Adam Humphries, who hasn’t played since sustaining an ankle injury in early December.

According to Weather.com, the Saturday night forecast in Baltimore calls for cloudy skies and temperatures in the low 60s with winds 10 to 15 miles per hour. However, the rain predicted earlier in the week now isn’t expected to begin until after midnight.

Below is the final injury report for Saturday’s game:

BALTIMORE
QUESTIONABLE: TE Mark Andrews (ankle), RB Mark Ingram (calf)

TENNESSEE
OUT: LB Jayon Brown (shoulder), WR Adam Humphries (ankle)
QUESTIONABLE: WR Cody Hollister

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Baltimore Ravens running back Gus Edwards runs for a touchdown against the Houston Texans during the second half of an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Gail Burton)

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With Ingram limited, Edwards ready for main role if called upon

Posted on 08 January 2020 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — With running back Mark Ingram still not practicing after apparently suffering a setback, the Ravens aren’t panicking ahead of their divisional playoff meeting with Tennessee.

As offensive coordinator Greg Roman put it, the Ravens “really don’t have to skip a beat” if Ingram can’t play, evident by their 223-yard rushing performance against a tough Pittsburgh defense in the regular-season finale two weeks ago. That’s not to say Baltimore isn’t hoping to have its Pro Bowl running back, who hasn’t played or practiced since injuring his left calf against Cleveland in Week 16.

“It’s day to day, so we’ll see. But that’s how it is in this league,” Roman said. “You’ve just got to be ready to adapt and adjust as it happens. Like in the course of a game, it happened a couple weeks ago against Cleveland. We had to make some adjustments there.”

The main adjustment would be turning to top backup Gus Edwards, who averaged 5.3 yards per carry this season and rushed for a career-high 130 yards against the Steelers in Week 17. The former rookie free agent from Rutgers led the Ravens in rushing last season and has served as one of the best short-yardage backs in the NFL this season, rushing for first downs on 34.6 percent of his attempts this season.

Averaging 5.3 yards per carry and rushing for 1,429 yards over his first two seasons, the 6-foot-1, 238-pound back is eager to show the Titans — or anyone else — he’s capable of being the feature back. Pro Football Focus has graded Edwards 26th among running backs this season.

“I like to take every rep with that mindset that it’s my opportunity to show what I can do,” Edwards said. “It’s unfortunate what Mark is going through right now, but I’ve got to step up. That’s why I’m here. I’m here to make plays, and I’m here to run the ball and help my team win games.”

While there should be little question about Edwards’ ability to run effectively against Tennessee’s 12th-ranked rush defense, the Saturday forecast calls for rain showers that could test the chemistry between Edwards and quarterback Lamar Jackson at the mesh point of Baltimore’s frequent read-option plays. The second-year back cited plenty of practice reps with Jackson as reason not to be concerned, but a couple miscues in the turnover department are seemingly what the Titans need in their effort to pull off a second-round upset.

Edwards had a fumble in each of the final two games of the regular season, but neither came on the hand-off from the quarterback.

“Ball handling and ball security comes into mind,” said Edwards of the wet forecast. “It’s a big part of the game, especially in the playoffs and especially in our offense where we’re running the ball so much. We definitely have to keep that in mind and protect the football.”

Should Ingram not be able to play in Saturday’s game, the Ravens may elect to promote either Byron Marshall or the newly signed Paul Perkins as a third running back behind Edwards and rookie Justice Hill on the game-day roster.

Tight end Mark Andrews is the only other Baltimore player on the injury report for a health-related reason as he continues to be limited with a right ankle injury sustained in Week 16. His availability doesn’t appear to be in question, but his speed and mobility will be worth monitoring after a three-week layoff from game action.

The Ravens made a 53-man roster move Wednesday by placing reserve offensive lineman Parker Ehinger (shoulder) on injured reserve and signing veteran offensive tackle Andre Smith. The longtime Cincinnati Bengal and former first-round pick from Alabama has made 98 starts in his NFL career and last appeared in a game in November.

Meanwhile, the Titans were again without inside linebacker Jayon Brown (shoulder) and cornerback Adoree’ Jackson (foot) for Thursday’s practice. Wide receiver Adam Humphries (ankle) is not expected to play and has been sidelined since early December.

Below is Wednesday’s full injury report:

BALTIMORE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: RB Mark Ingram (calf), DT Brandon Williams (non-injury)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: TE Mark Andrews (ankle)
FULL PARTICIPATION: CB Jimmy Smith (non-injury), S Earl Thomas (non-injury)

TENNESSEE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Jayon Brown (shoulder), LB Kamalei Correa (illness), WR Adam Humphries (ankle), CB Adoree’ Jackson (foot)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: G Nate Davis (illness), RB Dion Lewis (shoulder)
FULL PARTICIPATION: WR Cody Hollister (ankle), WR Kalif Raymond (concussion)

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Ingram absent from Ravens practice as concern grows about status

Posted on 07 January 2020 by Luke Jones

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — Ravens running back Mark Ingram was absent from Tuesday’s practice, increasing concerns about his availability for Saturday night’s divisional playoff game against Tennessee.

Just four days after saying the 2019 Pro Bowl selection was “on track to play” against the Titans and should be practicing “full speed” this week, head coach John Harbaugh deferred to the injury report when asked about Ingram’s status two hours before Tuesday’s practice. The 30-year-old has been sidelined since injuring his left calf in the Week 16 win at Cleveland on Dec. 22, making the possibility of a setback a concerning development with Baltimore’s postseason opener only four days away.

“We’re not talking about injuries this week,” Harbaugh said. “We’ll just wait and see. You’ll know on [Saturday] on all those guys.”

According to an NFL Network report, Ingram still has a chance to play Saturday despite feeling “some tightness” in his calf recently. Second-year running back Gus Edwards would start with rookie Justice Hill backing him up if Ingram is unable to play, but Baltimore signed veteran running back Paul Perkins to their practice squad Tuesday morning, which could be interpreted as another sign of concern about Ingram’s availability.

Edwards ran for a season-high 130 yards in the Week 17 win at Pittsburgh and has averaged an impressive 5.3 yards per carry this year, but he fumbled in each of the final two games of the regular season and doesn’t provided the same all-around skill set as Ingram, who also thrives as a pass blocker and as a receiver out of the backfield.

After initial fears that he’d sustained a serious injury, Ingram was optimistic late last month that he’d be available by the start of Baltimore’s postseason run.

“I have confidence I’ll be ready to go,” Ingram said on Dec. 26. “The team’s doing a good job, the training staff’s doing a good job [with] around-the-clock treatment and getting it ready to go. I’m pretty sure I’ll be ready to go for that first playoff game.”

The only other Ravens player to miss Tuesday’s practice due to injury was reserve offensive lineman Parker Ehinger (shoulder), but tight end Mark Andrews remained a limited participant with an ankle injury sustained in Week 16. Andrews missed the regular-season finale with the injury.

Tennessee was without starting inside linebacker Jayon Brown (shoulder), starting right guard Nate Davis (illness), starting wide receiver Adam Humphries (ankle), and starting cornerback Adoree’ Jackson (foot) for Tuesday’s practice. Brown injured his shoulder in Saturday’s wild-card playoff win at New England while Humphries hasn’t played since Week 13.

Below is Tuesday’s full injury report:

BALTIMORE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: OL Parker Ehinger (shoulder), RB Mark Ingram (calf), CB Jimmy Smith (non-injury), S Earl Thomas (non-injury)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: TE Mark Andrews (ankle)

TENNESSEE
DID NOT PARTICIPATE: LB Jayon Brown (shoulder), G Nate Davis (illness), WR Adam Humphries (ankle), CB Adoree’ Jackson (foot)
LIMITED PARTICIPATION: WR Cody Hollister (ankle), RB Dion Lewis (shoulder)
FULL PARTICIPATION: WR Kalif Raymond (concussion)

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