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Twelve Ravens thoughts on training camp preparations and other topics

Posted on 10 June 2020 by Luke Jones

With Ravens coaches returning to the Owings Mills headquarters this week and the NFL releasing protocols for training facilities, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. The July 28 report date for training camp is seven weeks away, but much work remains regarding COVID-19 protocols. The recent expansion and renovations of the team facility helps, but spacing lockers six feet apart for a 90-man roster will be quite a challenge by itself.

2. NFL Network’s report on the possibility of the preseason schedule being shortened was hardly a surprise since there was growing support for that long before the pandemic. The bigger question might be whether that sparks permanent change to the exhibition schedule.

3. Pittsburgh moving its camp to Heinz Field raises a fair question for teams that already struggled to find space for 90 players before even factoring in social distancing. A shorter preseason makes you wonder if that high number is absolutely necessary if you want to minimize health risks. Difficult questions.

4. Patrick Queen, Devin Duvernay, and Malik Harrison are the only 2020 Ravens draft picks yet to sign, but we’re approaching the time when you’d expect those rookie deals to get done. Of course, the pandemic could always complicate that timing.

5. Social media hardly provides a complete picture of the work so many players are putting in right now, but James Proche has logged recent workouts with Lamar Jackson, Robert Griffin III, and Trace McSorley. Good for the sixth-round rookie wide receiver getting acquainted with Baltimore quarterbacks.

6. You won’t find a more respected person in the organization than tight ends coach Bobby Engram, who was nominated for the PFWA’s George Halas Award for overcoming adversity to succeed. I recommend this piece from The Athletic’s Jeff Zrebiec if you’re unfamiliar with the Engram family’s story.

7. The value of the return specialist isn’t what it used to be due to rule changes in the game, but I can’t recall the last time we weren’t talking about that spot being a question mark around this time of year. The days of Jacoby Jones?

8. In contrast, Sam Koch is the only player to have any punts for the Ravens since 2006 and Justin Tucker is the only one to make a field goal since 2012. That continuity is just remarkable compared to most teams. Tennessee had four different kickers last season alone.

9. We’ve talked so much about inside linebacker the last couple years that I couldn’t help but notice Ravens coaching analyst and former player Zach Orr celebrated his 28th birthday on Tuesday. He thankfully escaped football without serious injury, but you wonder how much better he might have become.

10. Dick Cass, Ed Reed, Anquan Boldin, Torrey Smith, Ray Rice, Steve Smith, Calais Campbell, and Queen were among the current and former Ravens joining over 1,400 sports figures in signing a letter to Congress requesting an end to qualified immunity. I applaud them for making their voices heard.

11. Have you ever imagined what might have happened if Baltimore signed Colin Kaepernick? Does he replace a Joe Flacco who had a bad back in 2017? Reunited with Greg Roman, does Kaepernick thrive and keep the starting job? Does Lamar Jackson then wind up elsewhere? Quite the potential butterfly effect.

12. Kudos to the Ravens for putting out the following video for high school and college graduates. We all had different school experiences, but I can’t imagine not being able to enjoy those final weeks or to celebrate these accomplishments with friends and family.

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Twelve Ravens thoughts in early part of June

Posted on 04 June 2020 by Luke Jones

With the Ravens moving into the final weeks of virtual workouts and coaches on the verge of returning to the team facility in Owings Mills, I’ve offered a dozen thoughts, each in 50 words or less:

1. Steve Bisciotti’s latest of many donations in a difficult year was $1 million for a group of former and current Ravens to distribute to social justice reform efforts. Some have fairly noted the organization not signing Colin Kaepernick three years ago, but actions accompanying team-released statements are what’s needed now.

2. As they did with Terrell Suggs in 2008, the Ravens working out a compromise with Matthew Judon for his franchise tag tender always made sense. What doesn’t make sense is the NFL still using generic position labels like “linebacker” and “offensive lineman” in this system.

3. Ronnie Stanley made no reference to becoming the league’s highest-paid left tackle, but he wants “to get paid my value and what I’m worth” and expressed happiness for Laremy Tunsil’s record contract. Why wouldn’t he expect at least as much as what Houston is paying another 2016 draftee?

4. With uncertainty surrounding the season and how that could hurt the salary cap in the next year or two if fans can’t attend games or the schedule is condensed, teams are seemingly in no rush to do extensions right now. Tagging Stanley next March would be a no-brainer anyway.

5. I’ve always believed way too much is made of player-organized offseason workouts, but seeing clips of Lamar Jackson throw to some teammates in South Florida is another step toward some sports normalcy. I’m all for that.

6. The NFL requiring teams to stay at home facilities for training camp was hardly surprising, but you now wonder if we’ve seen the last of off-site camps, which were already disappearing rapidly. The 2011 lockout was the dagger for the Ravens training in Westminster.

7. New Carolina coach Matt Rhule revealed Wednesday that the Panthers were set to have joint practices with the Ravens in Owings Mills before the third preseason game until the pandemic erased those plans. More of these sessions still feel like the future for summer preparations.

8. Bradley Bozeman went from being perceived by many as the weak link who needed to be replaced early last season to someone already counted as a 2020 starter at either guard or center by his head coach. Of course, some continuity inside is critical with Marshal Yanda now retired.

9. In revealing Chuck Clark would likely continue to relay the calls in the defensive huddle and wear the “green-dot” helmet, John Harbaugh said, “He’s bold, he’s brilliant, and he’s brief.” Few Ravens have been praised for their football intellect like Clark in recent years.

10. I certainly would have endorsed the Ravens adding an elite talent like DeAndre Hopkins, but there’s something to be said for continuity at wide receiver while adding rookies Devin Duvernay and James Proche to the mix. A revolving door of veterans makes it difficult for a passing game to grow.

11. In handling great expectations for the upcoming season, Harbaugh said, “We’re going to be everyone’s most important game.” I can’t wait to see what Greg Roman comes up with to counter 2020 opponents who’ve been brainstorming all offseason to try to slow Jackson and this offense.

12. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my top 25 Ravens regular-season moments countdown as much as I’ve liked putting it together. It’s been a fun trip down memory lane at a time when many of us need that, and we still have quite a few to go.

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Ravens players adjusting to uncertainty with rest of sports world

Posted on 31 March 2020 by Luke Jones

April is a big month in the NFL offseason.

The draft and the schedule release dominate the headlines, but it’s also that time when players return to team facilities for the start of the offseason training program. For Ravens players coming off a franchise-best 14-2 season that ended in playoff heartbreak in mid-January, it was supposed to mark a reunion and the proverbial turning of the page with all sights toward the 2020 season.

But as the COVID-19 pandemic has already suspended the NBA and NHL seasons and postponed the start of baseball season with no end in sight, pondering the opening of an NFL season months from now brings more questions than answers. How could it not when stay-at-home orders, the closing of nonessential businesses, social distancing, and great concern for loved ones consume our everyday lives? The idea of more than 70,000 people packing a stadium for a game feels impossible — even dangerous — right now as we’re ordered to isolate from even family members and our closest friends.

“Nobody knows what’s going to go on, what’s going to come from this,” safety Chuck Clark said on a conference call with Baltimore media. “I would love to be able to play in a stadium again where fans are in there. That’s what we all live for — whether it’s basketball, baseball, football or hockey — playing in front of a crowd. And then even for the fans, for their enjoyment and having fun.”

But it’s one day at a time. Players have already adjusted their training routines over these last few weeks, but the scheduled April 20 opening of the Ravens’ offseason workout program clearly won’t be taking place at their Owings Mills facility. Team president Dick Cass has already expressed great doubt about organized team activities and spring minicamps being held, meaning the earliest return to the team facility for players may not be until training camp in July.

Tight end Mark Andrews said he hasn’t yet received details from Ravens coaches or staff members about how a spring program limited to at-home participation and remote communication will work.

“I don’t think anybody really knows what’s going to happen,” said Andrews, who described his current training setup at his Arizona home as a “prison workout” with free weights in his backyard. “There’s a ton of uncertainty right now with timelines and when people are going to report and when things are going to start up, so we’re not sure at the moment.

“But at the end of the day, we’re all going to be on the same playing field.”

Unlike teams with new head coaches and significant changes to their staffs, however, the Ravens benefit from stability as John Harbaugh enters his 13th season as head coach. Greg Roman and Wink Martindale will remain as coordinators despite interviewing for head coach positions in January, a development with even greater significance now for a team with championship aspirations.

With team meetings expected to be cyber sessions this spring, that familiarity will be important.

“Obviously, there are a ton of guys on the team that already know the system, the schemes and whatnot,” Andrews said. “It definitely helps, but we’re all professionals and even the guys that have new coaches and things like that, those guys are going to get that playbook down as fast as they can. That’s our job.”

Of course, thoughts of football are accompanied by the more serious problems and concerns we’re all facing to varying degrees. Being a Type-1 diabetic, Andrews initially wondered if he was at greater risk to the virus.

“The word right now is that there’s not too much more of a danger for me than anybody else,” said Andrews, who was selected to his first Pro Bowl last season. “Just like everybody else, I’m staying smart, I’m staying inside, I’m social distancing myself from other people. That’s all you can do.”

Like the rest of the sports world, Ravens players are trying to adapt and follow altered workout routines while waiting for that “all clear” message we all want sooner than later.

But unlike other sports and events, the NFL has time on its side with the scheduled start of the regular season still more than five months away, reason for cautious optimism. Still, it’s impossible to know what to expect as the pandemic has already disrupted the league’s pre-draft process, challenged the free-agent signing period, pushed the schedule release back to May, and very likely wiped out all on-site workouts this spring.

No one wants to dwell on the possibility of a lost season, but there’s much we’d rather not think about these days.

“It crosses your mind, but at the end of the day, at some point this will all clear up and it will get better,” Clark said. “When it’s over, you’re a professional athlete, and that’s what you’re asked to do. You have to be in tip-top shape to be ready to play.”

At some point.

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Ravens must balance opportunity with health in expanded preseason

Posted on 11 July 2018 by Luke Jones

Ravens rookies reported for the start of training camp on Wednesday, just a week after the Fourth of July holiday and two weeks before many other teams in the NFL begin their summer work.

The early start is the result of the Ravens’ first ever appearance in the Pro Football Hall of Fame Game against Chicago on Aug. 2, which falls a full week before the start of the usual preseason schedule for the rest of the league. Extra practice time is predictably met with lukewarm enthusiasm from most players — particularly veterans reporting to Owings Mills next Wednesday — but an extra week of workouts and the shortening of that summer dead period when players are on their own is any coach’s dream.

The longer training camp prompted head coach John Harbaugh to schedule two sets of joint practices: the first with the Los Angeles Rams in Owings Mills on Aug. 6 and 7 and the other sessions in Indianapolis before Baltimore’s third preseason game on Aug. 20. These will be the first joint practices for the Ravens since they traveled to Philadelphia to work with the Eagles in 2015 and will provide Harbaugh and his coaching staff a useful litmus test, especially against the talent-laden Rams coming off an NFC West title last year.

“We don’t have to pack quite as much into that time,” Harbaugh said last month, “which I think is a plus for us — especially with a young team and a young quarterback and three new receivers. It should benefit us.”

Harbaugh has already confirmed that most veterans will not play in the Hall of Fame Game in Canton, Ohio, but rookie first-round quarterback Lamar Jackson and the rest of a franchise-record-tying 12-man draft class playing in an extra preseason game has value. Considering how poorly the offense played for much of 2017 after Joe Flacco missed the entire preseason with a back injury, the veteran quarterback having an extra week of practice to continue building chemistry with newcomer receivers Michael Crabtree, John Brown, and Willie Snead is a bonus. And even a defense returning all but one player (reserve defensive back Lardarius Webb) from last season will benefit from extra sessions with new defensive coordinator Don “Wink” Martindale and his revamped schemes.

But that all comes with a risk.

Players aren’t immune to injuries when even working out on their own, of course, but Harbaugh will be tasked with striking the right balance between maximizing the extra opportunities and keeping his team healthy before kicking off the 2018 season against Buffalo on Sept. 9. It’s no secret that injuries have been crippling at times with Baltimore ranking sixth or higher in adjusted games lost in two of the last three seasons, an undeniable factor in not making the playoffs since 2014.

Measures have been taken in recent years to combat health concerns by revamping the offseason conditioning program and installing natural grass at M&T Bank Stadium, but the Ravens had a whopping 13 players on injured reserve by the time the 2017 season kicked off in Cincinnati last September. That number didn’t include tight end Dennis Pitta’s career-ending hip injury in the spring or Flacco’s summer-long absence and preceded season-ending injuries to Marshal Yanda and Brett Urban in the first three weeks of the regular season.

Injuries are inevitable in such a violent game with each competitive rep presenting the risk for something to go awry, whether it’s one player rolling into another’s leg, a big hit, or a simple misstep trying to cut upfield. That’s why Harbaugh will pick his spots as he’s annually done to try to keep players — particularly his veterans — as healthy as possible.

The extended preseason should provide more opportunities for that built-in rest as well.

“More is not always more,” Harbaugh said. “We’re going to get more because of the time, but too much more would be too much. The ability to space that out a little bit, the fact that we can go hard and recover a little more because we have a little more time to do that is going to be a plus for us.”

A bigger plus would be a healthier roster when the real games begin, which will require disciplined planning and more luck than in recent years.

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Nasty shares a smile with Art Modell 1998

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Chapter 10: The sad loss of a great work of Art

Posted on 21 January 2018 by Nestor Aparicio

 

“It’s a son talking to a father, that’s the way I looked at it. It’s hard talking about someone who loved you that much. It’s not as easy as you think it is. Everything I said in his ear came from my heart and I loved him dearly,”

— Ray Lewis (September 2012)

 

 

THE PAINTING HANGS OVER THE majestic fireplace at The Castle in Owings Mills and exudes the warmth of the man himself. Arthur Bertrand Modell. Founder. Baltimore Ravens.

Like several others in this purple tale of civic sports personalities who are more worthy of a book than a chapter, one could write tomes outlining the full color and complexity of the life and times of Arthur B. Modell. After nearly a lifetime of working the football business on the banks of Lake Erie beginning in March 1961 in his adopted homeland of Cleveland, the native New Yorker brought his beloved Browns franchise to Baltimore in November 1995 amidst national scorn. He was forever reviled in Ohio and beloved in Maryland. The economic reasons for the move are well documented. And Modell was clear that there were no other motives except for self-preservation, abandoning a decrepit stadium un-affectionately known as “The Mistake On The Lake” that was built in 1930. Coming to the shores of the Chesapeake Bay in an attempt to finally win a Super Bowl and create equity and a trust fund for his family in the only business he owned or cared about during his life was his only motivation.

Or as he once famously said regarding Baltimore, “I didn’t come here for the crab cakes!”

Five years later, on a team with four Hall of Famers, the Ravens won Super Bowl XXXV and forever changed the Baltimore sports landscape. The Ravens went from being a carpet-bagged sports franchise to a civic institution.

The unique part of the Ravens, being such a young franchise, is the amazing institutional memory that exists within a relatively new building and a teenage organization that has become the model for the NFL. Modell understood football’s value to a local community. He understood the allure of sports, and he recognized the partnership that a franchise needed to have with all elements of the fan base – men and women, children, and adults, rich and poor, black and white, blue collar and white collar, Jew, Gentile and non-believers. Art believed that a sports team could galvanize all parts of a community in a way that no other entity could muster.

And who would know more than Modell? He truly was one of a handful of pioneers who helped build the National Football League from a third-rate sport on the fringe of society in the early 1960s into the centerpiece of the American sports landscape during his 42 years of ownership.

Modell will be remembered for owning a football team in Cleveland and moving it to Baltimore, but he lived a very full life before he even arrived in Ohio as a well-heeled New York ad man who gave up his East Coast life and moved to the friendly heart of the Midwest. There, he sold football and lived football like his contemporaries Pete Rozelle, Al Davis, Lamar Hunt, and the other forefathers of modern football

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Construction to keep fans away from Ravens training camp in 2017

Posted on 05 January 2017 by Luke Jones

After inviting more and more fans to training camp in Owings Mills in the last few years, the Ravens will take a hiatus to be able to accommodate even larger groups in 2018 and beyond.

Due to the start of a $45 million renovation project at the Under Armour Performance Center, the organization announced it will not be able to welcome fans to this summer’s training camp. The Ravens plan to once again hold free practices at M&T Bank Stadium as they’ve done annually.

“We are disappointed that we will not be able to have fans at our training camp this summer because of the ongoing construction,” Ravens president Dick Cass told the official team website. “But the good news is that when fans return to training camp in the summer of 2018, the changes we are now making will make the fan experience at training camp even better.”

The organization has purchased more land surrounding the facility, which will create more parking to accommodate fans at summer practices in the future. The plan is to provide parking for up to 1,200 fans.

In 2011, the Ravens permanently moved their annual training camp from McDaniel College in Westminster to their Owings Mills training facility, but they conducted lotteries to invite season-ticket holders to watch practices in recent summers.

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Ravens looking to invite more fans to training camp

Posted on 23 March 2015 by Luke Jones

The Ravens haven’t held training camp at McDaniel College in five years, but the organization wants to bring the old Westminster feel to their Owings Mills facility in the coming summers.

Team president Dick Cass told reporters at the league meetings in Phoenix that the Ravens are exploring ways to accommodate more fans to attend training camp practices. The possibilities include buying land adjacent to the team’s training facility for additional parking.

After the Ravens accommodated a maximum of 500 fans at certain practices last summer, Cass told the team’s official website that they hope to bring 1,000 fans per day to camp workouts this summer and 3,000 spectators to individual practices by 2016, which would be more in line with the types of crowds they once saw in Westminster. The organization also plans to bring in more entertainment for fans at the training facility.

The Ravens held training camp in Westminster from 1996 through 2010, but the 2011 camp was moved to the training facility in Owings Mills due to the uncertainty that accompanied the offseason lockout. Baltimore officially decided a year later to keep summer workouts at their multimillion-dollar facility moving forward to better prepare for the regular season, but the move eliminated arguably the most intimate setting for fans to watch players and interact with them.

Cass said the Ravens will once again hold a training camp practice at M&T Bank Stadium this summer, which is currently slated for Aug. 3. It remains unclear whether they will hold another practice at the Naval Academy in Annapolis this summer.

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Ravens announce two open Training Camp practices

Posted on 11 June 2014 by WNST Staff

2014 RAVENS TRAINING CAMP PRACTICES

The Baltimore Ravens’ 2014 training camp, will feature free individual stadium practices for the third-consecutive year at M&T Bank Stadium and Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis. Additionally, by entering a lottery on the Ravens’ official website, fans in limited numbers will have an opportunity to win free tickets to training camp practices held at 1 Winning Drive in Owings Mills.

The M&T Bank Stadium practice will showcase the Ravens’ first-ever Fireworks Night on Monday, July 28, an event highlighted by post-practice autographs for children and a fireworks/laser show. The Ravens’ practice at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium will take place on Monday, Aug. 4 and feature a youth football clinic on the field prior to practice. There will also be an autograph session for children following practice.

Practices for both of these venues are free and open to the public and will have interactive fan events, including the player autograph signings for children, fun-filled activities designed specifically for younger fans, giveaways and cheerleader/mascot meet-and-greets. (Further details for both events are below.)

 

FAN LOTTERY FOR TRAINING CAMP PRACTICES

The Ravens can safely host up to 300 people on the fields of their Owings Mills training complex, and fans who are randomly chosen through the online drawing will be invited to view one of the team’s 12 open training camp sessions at the Under Armour Performance Center. The first full-team training camp practice is July 24, and the last is Aug. 14.

Beginning Thursday, June 12 at 10 a.m., fans may enter a lottery at http://www.baltimoreravens.com/trainingcamp to attend one training camp practice at the Under Armour Performance Center. All lottery submissions must be made by Tuesday, July 1 at 5 p.m., and the Ravens will contact fans who are chosen for these practices no later than Sunday, July 13. Details – including parking, practice day/time and procedures – will be communicated to winning recipients upon notification.  

 

STADIUM TRAINING CAMP FAMILY PRACTICES 

Event:                                   Fireworks Night at M&T Bank Stadium (Baltimore, MD) – Free and Open to the Public

When:                                  Monday, July 28

Practice Start Time:        7 p.m.

Gates Open:                      5:30 p.m.

Parking:                               Stadium lots open at 4 p.m. and are available for cold tailgating. The parking fee is $10.                

Details:                                Highlighted by a post-practice player autograph session for children and afireworks/laser show, the Fireworks Night practice will also feature entertainment that includes Baltimore’s Marching Ravens, cheerleaders, official mascot Poe and live mascots Rise and Conquer. The Ravens Team Store and concession stands will also be open.

 

Event:                                   Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium Practice (Annapolis, MD) – Free and Open to the Public

When:                                  Monday, Aug. 4

Practice Start Time:        7 p.m.

Gates Open:                      5:30 p.m.

Parking:                               Lots open at 4 p.m. and are available for cold tailgating.

  • ·     $10 for cars and $25 for buses
  • ·     Parking may be purchased via www.navysports.com
  • ·     If Navy lots become full, nearby off-site locations are available with stadium shuttles.

Details:                                Baltimore’s Marching Ravens, cheerleaders, official mascot Poe and live mascots Rise and Conquer will be in attendance. The Ravens Team Store will be on site, and concession stands will be open. Prior to practice, the Ravens will host a RISE youth football clinic on the field featuring area players and teams. (More information about clinic registration, which begins June 23, will be shared at a later date.)

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Enjoy Labor Day with your family and Fox Sports Radio on WNST!

Posted on 02 September 2013 by WNST Staff

We hope you have a wonderful Labor Day enjoying time with your family, friends and us here at WNST.net!

We’ve allowed our local hosts to spend their Labor Day with their loved ones, you’ll be in the more than capable hands of Fox Sports Radio’s talented national lineup on AM1570 and streaming live at WNST.net/TuneIn Radio app!

In the meantime, we’ll have the Baltimore Ravens’ practice in Owings Mills covered (including media availability with coordinators Jim Caldwell, Dean Pees and Jerry Rosburg) here at WNST.net and @WNST on Twitter. Plus we’ll be keeping tabs on the Baltimore Orioles as they open a crucial series at the Cleveland Indians Monday afternoon as well!

We’ll be live and local once again Tuesday morning with Drew Forrester and Luke Jones 6am on The D&L Window Tinting Morning Reaction. Don’t forget our next “Grab a Bud” Happy Hour with Glenn Clark from “The Reality Check” is Tuesday night at Hooters Towson!

And don’t forget that both Drew and Glenn make an appearance in “America’s Game: The 2012 Baltimore Ravens”, which debuts tonight at 9pm on the NFL Network.

Have a wonderful day off Monday. Go Birds!

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Ravens opening three Training Camp practices to fans again

Posted on 17 June 2013 by WNST Staff

2013 RAVENS TRAINING CAMP PRACTICES

 

The Baltimore Ravens’ 2013 training camp, connected by Verizon, will feature for the second-consecutive year free individual practices to be held at M&T Bank Stadium, Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium and Stevenson University. Additionally, by entering a lottery on the Ravens’ official website, fans in limited numbers will have the opportunity to win free tickets to training camp at the Under Armour Performance Center in Owings Mills.

The Ravens can safely host 200 people on the fields of their training center, and fans who are randomly chosen through the drawing will be invited to view one of the team’s 13 open training camp sessions at the Under Armour Performance Center. The first full-team training camp practice is July 25 and the last is Aug. 13.

Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium will be the site for a training camp practice on Sunday, Aug. 4. The Ravens will then practice at M&T Bank Stadium on Sunday, Aug. 11. Both of these sessions are free and open to the public.

The team will round out its off-site training camp sessions at Mustang Stadium at Stevenson University on Sunday, Aug. 18. While this is a free event, due to limited seating, fans must enter a lottery on the Ravens’ website for an opportunity to win tickets.

Each of these practice venues will feature interactive fan events, including player autograph signings for children, fun-filled activities designed specifically for youth and cheerleader/mascot meet-and-greets.

Additionally, this year, fans can enter a website lottery to reserve tickets to the premiere of “America’s Game: The Super Bowl Champions.” An annual documentary series created by NFL Films profiling each season’s winning Super Bowl team, the 2012 Ravens’ feature will debut at the Patricia and Arthur Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric in Baltimore on Aug. 27.

 

FAN LOTTERY FOR TRAINING CAMP PRACTICES & “AMERICA’S GAME”

Beginning today (June 17), fans may enter a lottery at http://www.baltimoreravens.com/ravenstown/training-camp/index.html to attend one training camp practice at the Under Armour Performance Center or the practice held at Stevenson University. Fans may also enter to win tickets to the premiere of “America’s Game: The Super Bowl Champions.”

All lottery submissions must be made by Monday, July 1 at 5 p.m., and the Ravens will contact fans who are chosen for these practices no later than Wednesday, July 17. Details – including parking, practice day/time and procedures – will be communicated to winning recipients upon notification.

 

RAVENS OFF-SITE TRAINING CAMP PRACTICES 

Location:                             Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium (Annapolis, MD) – Free and Open to the Public

When:                                  Sunday, Aug. 4

Practice Start Time:        5 p.m.

Gates Open:                      3:30 p.m.

Parking:                               Lots open at 1 p.m. and are available for cold tailgating.

  • ·     $10 for cars and $25 for buses
  • ·     Parking may be purchased via www.navysports.com
  • ·     If Navy lots become full, nearby off-site locations are available with stadium shuttles.

Other Details:                   Baltimore’s Marching Ravens, cheerleaders, official mascot Poe and live mascots Rise and Conquer will be in attendance. The Ravens Team Store will be on-site, and concession stands will be open.

 

Location:                             M&T Bank Stadium (Baltimore, MD) – Free and Open to the Public

When:                                  Sunday, Aug. 11

Practice Start Time:        5 p.m.

Gates Open:                      3:30 p.m.

Parking:                               Stadium lots open at 1 p.m. and are available for cold tailgating. The parking fee is $10.                

Other Details:                   Baltimore’s Marching Ravens, cheerleaders, official mascot Poe and live mascots Rise and Conquer will be in attendance. The Ravens Team Store and concession stands will be open.

 

Location:                             Mustang Stadium at Stevenson University (Owings Mills, MD) – Free Tickets Via Lottery

When:                                  Sunday, Aug. 18

Practice Start Time:        5 p.m.

Gates Open:                      3:30 p.m.

Tickets:                                Due to limited seating, this is a ticketed event, one for which fans can sign up via lottery at

                  www.baltimoreravens.com/TCLottery

Parking:                               Parking will be provided when tickets are sent to fans.

  • ·     No tailgating

Other Details:                   The Ravens Team Store will be on-site, and concession stands will be open.

 

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