Tag Archive | "smith"

Kuzy win Flames

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Kuznetsov’s Late Tally Ends Caps’ 7-Game Losing Streak

Posted on 01 February 2019 by Ed Frankovic

Evgeny Kuznetsov scored on the power play with 57 seconds left in regulation after Nicklas Backstrom drew a holding penalty on Mikael Backlund with 1:58 remaining to propel the Washington Capitals to a 4-3 victory over the Western Conference leading Calgary Flames and end the Caps seven game losing streak. The triumph improves the Capitals to 28-17-6 (62 points) and they are tied for second place with the Pittsburgh Penguins, who have an identical record, just two points behind the first place New York Islanders in the Metropolitan Division.

What follows are my thoughts and analysis of a much needed win for the Capitals.

Alexander Ovechkin, who leads the NHL in goals with 37, was suspended for this tilt because he chose to skip the NHL All Star Game in San Jose to get some much needed rest. Washington as a whole needed the All Star break and subsequent bye week to get away from the game and recharge because they looked gassed during the latter stages of their losing streak. The Caps were playing bad hockey, hopefully just caused by fatigue, by forcing pucks to the middle of the ice at the offensive blue line and that was leading to numerous odd man rushes and scoring chances for their opponents. In addition, their defensive zone coverage and overall play was suspect and lacked energy. That made things difficult for the goaltenders, which suddenly lost the roll they were on when the Capitals won 16 of 19 games before the slide.

Prior to Friday’s tilt against the fast and talented Flames, Washington Capitals Coach Todd Reirden emphasized that the team needed to return to a more structured game. What he meant was smarter decisions with the puck – specifically getting the biscuit deep in the offensive zone, either on net or below the goal line, and then working the opposition to create scoring opportunities. He also wanted a more committed effort in the neutral and defensive zones to limit opposing scoring chances. He received a lot of that against Calgary. The Capitals didn’t yield many odd man rushes in this affair and the Flames had to really work to generate shots. They are a very good team, so naturally they had their looks, but much like they did last spring, Washington blocked a lot of shots, 27 in total!

When you get 40 shots on goal, you are making smarter decisions with the biscuit, and the Caps did just that in this affair. The Flames Mike Smith (36 saves) used his size to make some big stops, especially in period two when Washington failed to increase their 3-2 lead on three consecutive power plays. What was impressive about the Capitals offense was that they just kept firing the puck and put bodies to the cage. They didn’t get frustrated and resort to trying to make the perfect play. It takes energy to fight to the front of the net and get some ugly goals, but the Caps did that. Nic Dowd opened the scoring tipping home Norris Trophy candidate John Carlson’s point blast with Devante Smith-Pelly also providing net presence on the play. The Capitals second goal was a sequence where they won the puck down low, Brett Connolly then made a super pass to Brooks Orpik at the left point, and #44’s shot was right on the cage and hard to handle for Smith. Lars Eller kept the puck alive and then Dmitrij Jaskin potted the rebound to make it 2-1 late in period one.

Washington’s special teams have been much maligned of late with the power play falling to 10th in the NHL and the penalty killing in the bottom fourth of the league (25th at 77.7% overall). Against Calgary, the Caps didn’t score on their first three man advantage situations, although T.J. Oshie, who played from the Ovi spot, hit the post. However, Kuzy saved the unit and the game with his rush goal with the man advantage late in regulation. The Caps did a better job of staying out of the box, although I hated Dmitry Orlov’s lazy offensive zone holding penalty in the third period, so they only had to kill two Flames power plays. They were fortunately successful, although James Neal had a couple of great chances that, like in game four of the Stanley Cup Final, he did not bury.

In the sixth loss of the streak the Caps gave up a goal with one second left against San Jose and then lost in overtime. The defensive pair at the time of the tying tally was Matt Niskanen and Michal Kempny. For some reason, Orpik, who was +3 in that game in only 12 minutes of ice time, didn’t see the surface over the last 3:52. It’s possible he was banged up, because he didn’t play in Toronto the next night, but given the way he historically has been deployed – he’s usually on the ice at the end when the Caps are holding a one goal lead; it was head scratching that he wasn’t out there and if he would’ve been, the Capitals would’ve won. Against the Flames, Orpik was on the ice at the end of the game as Calgary tried to tie things up with Smith pulled for the extra attacker. Brooks cleaned house in front of the net, along with Backstrom, who put Johnny Gaudreau into the boards, and Washington never gave up a quality scoring chance as the clock expired. It was nice to see the coaches get the proper players on the ice in a key situation there. Orpik also got into it with pesky Matthew Tkachuk after the horn with each getting five for fighting.

Braden Holtby, who was stellar in the All Star Game, especially in the match up versus the Atlantic Division team when he stopped about six straight odd man rush chances, had a strong game. The three goals he allowed on 30 shots were a breakaway where Jonas Siegenthaler was badly beaten one on one by Backlund and then two deflection tallies. Holts’ biggest stop of the evening was on Neal at the left post. When Washington plays strong defense, it is much easier for the Holtbeast to know where the shots are coming from. The Caps still have work to do to get their game going full throttle, but Friday’s play was a strong step in the right direction.

Notes: The Caps, who were dead last in the NHL in face-offs at 46.2% coming into the game, were 33-41 (45%) against Calgary. Dowd was 7-4, Kuznetsov went 5-15, and Backstrom was 12-19…the Caps might need to look at adding a faceoff/PK specialist for the stretch run and playoffs (Brian Boyle anyone?)…Kuznetsov (1 goal, 1 assist) and Tom Wilson (14th goal of the season) led the team with six shots on net…Willy had six hits in 20:31 of ice time. He is a beast and such an important part of this team…Carlson led the Caps in ice time with 27:37. He should win the Norris Trophy this season, if I had my way….next up for the Caps are the Boston Bruins on Sunday at 12:30 pm from Capital One Arena in the annual Super Bowl Matinee.

Comments Off on Kuznetsov’s Late Tally Ends Caps’ 7-Game Losing Streak

images

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thirty years after Mayflower crime, I’ve pardoned Irsay and moved on from the hate

Posted on 20 August 2018 by Nestor Aparicio

(Originally published on March 28, 2011, I think this is appropriate for where my life stands with #JennStrong & #BmorePositive mojo. nja)

Twenty-seven years ago today I awoke to see my father crying in my kitchen in Dundalk. It was one of two times that I ever saw him cry. The Baltimore Colts’ infamous ride of the Mayflowers out west on I-70 just two months after I started interning at The News American defined the end of my childhood at 15 and the beginning of my lifelong education about money and the real world of sports for the remainder of my sports fan and business life as a journalist.

It’s been a tumultuous quarter of a century plus a year for my feelings of anger, anguish, desperation, loss and bad vibes about the Colts leaving Baltimore on March 28, 1984. My Pop died in 1992 and never got to see the Ravens come back to town to avenge the loss of the horseshoe. I never got to go to one more football game with my father. And over the years, it’s really been a civic badge of honor to hate on all things Irsay and Indianapolis.

I’ve been to Indianapolis more times than I can count since 1996 – always for a football game or the annual March combine. There’s never been a time that it hasn’t taken me 15 minutes on the ground there to get ill seeing the horseshoes and “Go Colts” kind of marketing that is ubiquitous in Indy from the minute you land at the airport. It drives my wife batty — my almost irrational instant anger, ranting and self-inflicted torture when I’m in Indianapolis. I’ve always figured that I’d proudly be like the old dudes in Brooklyn, still pining away about the Dodgers 50 years later.

Here’s an example:

It’s taken me years of internal therapy and self soothing to calm myself when I see the game day experience there in Indy as those Midwestern hillbillies parade around in my father’s stolen laundry. In many ways, our “friend” Merton From Indianapolis (and no, none of us has any idea who he is or where the whole gimmick started – honest to God!) sort of exemplifies the entire experience of dealing with their fans when you travel to the “friendly heartland.”

My loathing of all things Irsay and Indianapolis is a bit legendary – there are plenty of pictures of me carrying Bob Irsay’s head on a stick through the streets of Indy — and my rants and raves throughout the 1990s are all very “on the record” and still accurate. What happened to this community at the hands of Bob Irsay and how I saw it affect my father and the psyche of the citizenry here will never been forgotten. The degrading and demoralizing “begging” to get back into the league that fell on Herb Belgrad. Paul Tagliabue’s “build a museum” expansion declaration in Chicago. All of it…I’ll remember those feelings and emotions for the rest of my life. Most Baltimoreans older than me — and I was born in 1968 – still can’t begin to imagine a world without the Colts of that generation. If you’re from Baltimore, sports is etched into your DNA.

(And if you doubt those feelings, imagine how you’d feel if the Ravens packed up and left tomorrow morning and never played another game here? For you young’ins that’s essentially what happened here in 1984…)

But after long and careful consideration – and as today’s 26th anniversary of the dastardly

Comments Off on Thirty years after Mayflower crime, I’ve pardoned Irsay and moved on from the hate

Osh Babe SCF 4

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Thoughts on the Caps As They Try To Close Out Vegas

Posted on 05 June 2018 by Ed Frankovic

“All we need is one pin, Rodney”

That classic line from Ben Davidson to Rodney Dangerfield in that famed Miller Lite Commercial from way back in 1982 now applies to the Washington Capitals.

The Caps, who didn’t get much respect last summer or even in the early rounds of this spring’s playoffs, now have a chance to skate with the Stanley Cup with one more triumph in their best of seven series with the Vegas Golden Knights. Washington used a furious final 10 minutes of period one in game four to tally three times en route to a 4-0 lead after two periods and eventually a 6-2 victory.

Six different players lit the lamp for the Caps and now they head to Sin City for game five on Thursday night at 8 pm with a chance to take Lord Stanley.

What follows are 10 thoughts and analysis of a huge victory in front of another rowdy crowd at Capital One Arena.

I Got You Babe – The Caps had a very shaky first nine minutes with the Golden Knights missing some superb chances, including Reilly Smith misfiring from in tight when he appeared to have the left side of the cage available and then James Neal hitting the post on the power play with a yawning cage in front of him. After those misses, Vegas’ Colin Miller was called for a blatant trip of Lars Eller in the neutral zone at 9:22. Thirty-two seconds later, the Capitals fans were up and out of their seats when T.J. Oshie buried the rebound of an Evgeny Kuznetsov shot off of Marc-Andre Fleury (17 saves). Oshie going to the net for the loose change was a common theme in this affair for Washington, who primarily won the game because of their net presence and stronger net front protection on defense. The Osh Babe, who some wanted to be let go as a free agent last June, now has eight goals in this postseason and is fourth on the team in points (21). T.J.’s two assists were critical ones, as well. His first helper came on the power play when he won a puck battle in front of the Vegas net that allowed Kuzy to set up John Carlson for the fourth Caps tally. In period three, after Nicklas Backstrom won a board battle in the neutral zone against two Golden Knights, Oshie skated in and dropped the puck to Backy with Miller closing in on him. T.J. made contact with Miller, who immediately bent over covering his face. Backstrom would skate in and feed Michal Kempny cross ice for a dagger four on four goal that made it 5-2 with 6:21 remaining. Vegas coach Gerard Gallant afterwards said Miller broke his nose and that Oshie should’ve been penalized. To me, it was just a hockey play and Miller hasn’t won over the zebras with his penalties and moments of embellishment, especially against #77, in this series. The Osh Babe was relentless in his pursuit of the puck in this tilt and earned the game’s number one star in 17:37 of ice time. Oshie was also cross checked badly by the reckless Brayden McNabb with 2:16 remaining, but was fine after the contest.

Magic Man – Following up on his number one star performance in game three, Evgeny Kuznetsov had another spectacular affair with four assists in 20:37 of ice time and was named the night’s second star. Kuzy had the primary assists on three of the first four Caps goals, the first by shooting and generating a juicy rebound and the other two with gorgeous feeds to Tom Wilson and Carlson, respectively. Number 92 logged 20:37 of ice time and leads the entire NHL in playoff points (31). He has 12 goals and 19 assists and is a big reason why the Caps are in the Final and leading. All season long I’ve talked and blogged about how important he is to this team and he’s taken his game to superstar status this post season.

Under the Radar – Backstrom quietly had three assists in this victory while and he his linemates neutralized the Vegas top trio of William Karlsson, Jonathan Marchessault, and Riley Smith. Nicky’s two way play and shut down ability really allows Coach Barry Trotz to get some advantageous matchups, especially at home. Number 19 has 22 points in 19 playoff games and continues to be outstanding despite a less than 100% right hand.

Commitment – Washington blocked 24 shots in game four and 20 of them came from Capital blue liners. Brooks Orpik led the way with six while Kempny had five, and Matt Niskanen had four. Two of the four Caps forward blocked shots came on one shift, with Brett Connolly (1 goal) getting in the way of two point blasts. The Capitals continue to get in the shooting lanes while allowing their goaltender to see the shots, so if they don’t block it, he can make the save. At the other end, the Golden Knights only had eight shot blocks.

Power Station – The Caps power play went 0 for 4 in game three, but on Monday night they exploded with a three for five outing, including scoring on their first two attempts to break the game open in the first forty minutes. The initial PP marker came on the rush (Oshie’s rebound goal) and then the second was a real back breaker for Vegas, Carlson’s blast from the Ovi spot. Credit special teams coach, Blaine Forsythe, for adjusting things up front. An Alex Ovechkin and Carlson swap opened up a huge passing lane since the Golden Knights had a forward come up way high at the point to try and limit the Gr8, and Kuznetsov exploited it.

Last Line of Defense – This was far from the Caps best game overall as they gave up many high danger scoring chances, something they did a better job of limiting in game three. Fortunately for the Capitals, they blocked several shots and more importantly, Braden Holtby (28 saves) was once again dialed in. The Holtbeast continues to be the key for Washington in these playoffs with stellar goaltending, something you must have to win a Championship.

Be Good Johnny – “Big Game” Carlson continued his incredible season with a laser of a goal in 25:07 of team and game leading ice time. Carly took two penalties in the first half of the game, but was a force defensively with his positioning and most importantly, his zone clears. When the stakes get high, this guy always seems to up his game to another level. He has five goals and 14 assists in the 2018 post season. Pay the Man!

Land of Opportunity – Both teams had scoring chances in this game, but it’s been the Capitals who have made the most of their opportunities, after Vegas did so in game one, by getting to the front of the net and notching in close tallies on Fleury. Washington, after getting the lead, has taken advantage of the Vegas blue line pinching in the offensive zone to generate odd man rushes. Ovechkin had a pair of two on ones when the Capitals had a lead, but was too unselfish and forced a pass when the shot was there. In game five, the Gr8 needs to think shoot first, because he has the best one in the league and if Fleury makes the save, there’s a good chance a rebound will occur.

Road Warriors – The Caps are 9-3 on the road in the playoffs and a big reason is their ability to play the right way. Washington doesn’t get fancy and employs more of a north-south style away from Capital One Arena. Part of the Capitals poor first nine minutes on Monday was their inability to get pucks deep; there were too many east-west passes in the neutral zone. The Capitals are at their best when they have the lead and play that 1-1-3 formation that forces their opponents to really gamble to beat it. In game five, limiting turnovers, keeping Vegas on the perimeter, and crashing the net is the formula for success. This game is the first ever in Washington hockey history where they can win the Cup. As Coach Trotz stated after game four, he’s excited because the Caps still haven’t played their best game in this series yet. I concur, they have another level they can get to and it starts with good puck management.

“All we need is one win”

Notes – Washington lost the face off battle, 33-31, but the second Caps goal came off of a faceoff where Ovi put a nice stick lift check on Deryk Engelland to jar the puck free and start the cycle play…Jay Beagle went 8-7 to lead the Caps while Karlsson was 10-4 for Vegas…the Golden Knights had 39 hits to 29 for the Capitals. Orpik led Washington with six and Wilson had four…Shea Theodore led Vegas in ice time with 23:36…the end of the game turned into a mess when the Golden Knights lost their composure. McNabb hit Oshie with a bit of a cheap shot and then Ryan Reaves tried to go after several Caps, including Orpik, before being tossed by referees Chris Rooney and Kelly Sutherland. Engelland and Oshie were also given late misconducts…in a classy move, Caps radio play by play man, John Walton, brought back long time Caps broadcaster (1974-1997), Ron Weber, to call the game’s first period. Afterwards I caught up with JW and congratulated him on the move. John responded by stating that “Ron was a plus three!”

Comments Off on 10 Thoughts on the Caps As They Try To Close Out Vegas

VGK Finals

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Caps Will Face A Strong and Confident Vegas Squad in the Stanley Cup Final

Posted on 27 May 2018 by Ed Frankovic

For the first time in 20 years the Washington Capitals will be playing in the Stanley Cup Final. The last time they managed to win three rounds, in 1998, they were swept by the Detroit Red Wings, who would win their second straight title with a loaded team. In those days, there wasn’t an NHL salary cap, so many of the bigger market franchises were able to stack their rosters up with talent by spending more money. Go back and take a look at that Red Wings roster, coached by the legendary Scotty Bowman, and you’ll see the names of many Hall of Fame players such as Steve Yzerman, Sergei Fedorov, Brendan Shanahan, Nicklas Lidstrom, and Larry Murphy.

In 2018, outspending other teams by wide margins is no longer the case with the salary cap in place along with last season’s NHL expansion draft. Former Capitals General Manager George McPhee, who knew he would be getting a good player from all 30 teams, did a marvelous job of assembling a roster that is big and fast. Not many picked the Vegas Golden Knights to make the playoffs, but they bonded together after the tragedy at the country music festival last October outside Mandalay Bay, rode goalie Marc Andre-Fleury to some early wins when they were outplayed, and then found a lot of confidence along the way en route to the Pacific Division title.

This Golden Knights squad is no fluke and their accomplishments should be celebrated, because they earned it defeating the Los Angeles Kings, San Jose Sharks, and Winnipeg Jets in just 15 playoff games. Coach Gerard Gallant and his staff have done a masterful job of getting each player to buy in and play a north-south style of hockey with speed and size. Heading into the season, there were no star players on this roster, other than the three time Stanley Cup Champion goaltender, and each player arrived with a hunger to be a regular player and make a mark in this league. Boy did this squad stick to the script, turning a “Land of Misfit Toys” type group into the Western Conference Champions.

They have star players now, and it starts up front with their top line of William Karlsson (43 goals), Jonathan Marchessault (27 goals), and Riley Smith. Both Karlsson and Marchessault have had career years and moved into the star category this season. Those two have 14 of the 43 goals that Vegas has scored this post season and Smith also has added two tallies to go with his 14 assists. They are a formidable top line and the Capitals have to be careful not make mistakes against them because they will burn Washington with odd man rushes using their speed. The Caps need to continue to play a north-south style and avoid offensive zone blue line cross ice passes against the whole Golden Knights squad, but especially this top line. I look for Coach Barry Trotz to try and get Nicklas Backstrom’s line, with T.J. Oshie and Jakub Vrana and the Dmitry Orlov and Matt Niskanen blue line duo out against the Marchessault trio, which averages right around 20 minutes a game in time on ice, as much as possible in this series.

Vegas’ second line at the end of the Winnipeg series was centered by the speedy Erik Haula and flanked by former Nashville Predator James Neal, and the big and superfast Alex Tuch. That trio has combined for 13 goals this post season. This line is downright scary in terms of speed and Tuch and Neal bring a lot of grit, too. They are great on the fore check and Neal is a supremely talented offensive player that knows how to go to the net. There are times, depending on the matchups, where Tuch gets moved to the third line and David Perron, who missed four playoff games due to injury, plays on the second unit. Either way, this is a line that you better not go to sleep on when they are on the ice.

Former Capital Cody Eakin and Ryan Carpenter are mainstays on the third line and complete the top nine for Vegas. Eakin is a very fast player, but is not big, while Carpenter, at six feet one, plays with size and is strong on the boards. It will be interesting to see if Gallant puts this line against the Caps top line of Evgeny Kuznetsov, Alex Ovechkin, and Tom Wilson or he tries to match the Neal-Haula-Tuch unit against Ovi and company.

Rounding out Vegas’ forwards are Pierre Edouard-Bellemare, Tomas Nosek, Ryan Reaves, and former Red Wing, Tomas Tatar. Tatar has had pass success against Washington, so I wouldn’t be surprised to see him promoted back into the lineup versus the Caps. Bellemare, a former Flyer, is a prototypical fourth line player that is strong on the puck and does a great job of killing penalties. Reaves is a big force and a protector, so the key for the Caps is to not have Wilson get engaged with the big man who scored the game winner that put Vegas into the Stanley Cup Final. Will Carrier, who has been out injured and practiced on Sunday in a non-contact jersey, could be back in later in the series to provide physical play on the fourth line, as well. The Capitals need Willy on the ice in this series and not in the penalty box.

On the back end, the Golden Knights are led by former Caps defensemen, Nate Schmidt. Schmidty is a popular guy who skates extremely well and moves the puck out of his zone quickly. He also has a strong shot and leads Vegas in average ice time in the playoffs (24:53 per contest). Number 88 is often on the ice with former Los Angeles King Brayden McNabb (average of 22:02 per game in the playoffs). Their second defensive pair is the physical former Penguin and Flame, Deryk Engelland, and Shea Theodore. Engelland fits the Brooks Orpik mold for Vegas in that he’s physical and is a penalty killing specialist. The blue line is strong for the Western Conference Champions as evidenced by a third duo of Colin Miller and Luca Sbisa. Sbisa is a very good puck mover, while the six foot one Miller brings size and a big shot on the power play.

In net, the Capitals will try to defeat Fleury for the first time in the post season. Number 29 has given up lots of tallies to the Caps in the past, but when the chips are on the line, he’s 2-0 in game sevens allowing only two goals. He’s the single biggest reason that the 2016-17 Presidents’ Trophy Winning Washington Capitals squad lost to the eventual Stanley Cup Champion Pens in round two. Fleury has been on fire in goal as Vegas has rolled through these playoffs and he clearly has taken his performance to a new level under former Capitals goalie coach, Dave Prior.

On special teams, the Golden Knights are a super penalty killing team (82.5% in the post season) and can burn you with shorthanded goals, if you aren’t careful. Karlsson is especially dangerous there. On the power play (17.6%) they rely a lot on shots from the top of the point with net presence. Both Schmidt and Miller have cannons and guys like Neal and Smith are strong at tipping pucks or potting rebounds. You also have to really watch Marchessault and Karlsson because they can pass the puck and have been successful finding that cross box seam play that has hurt the Capitals this postseason. Washington’s penalty killing crew is only at 75.4% in this playoff run, so the Caps must be better there to have a chance to win this series.

Vegas comes into this series as the favorites given their success that has led to supreme confidence, home ice advantage (only lost once at T-Mobile Arena this spring), and the fact that they are healthier and more rested than the Caps, who have played four more games. As has been the case in the past two Capitals series, having the lead by the game’s midway point will be crucial to the winner of each contest as both teams have very good goalies and a strong defensive posture that makes coming back from a deficit very difficult.

The outcome could go either way and one thing is for sure, one of these franchises is going to win their first Stanley Cup!

Comments (1)

Winnik Bench Yotes

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Winnik’s Hard Work Leads Caps to a 4-1 Win Over Arizona

Posted on 26 March 2017 by Ed Frankovic

Daniel Winnik scored with 4:39 remaining on a rush goal to break a 1-1 tie and Braden Holtby made 28 saves to lead the Washington Capitals to a 4-1 victory over the Arizona Coyotes at the Verizon Center on Saturday night. The triumph improves the Caps record to 49-17-8 (106 points) and they lead both the Pittsburgh Penguins and Columbus Blue Jackets in the Metropolitan Division by three points with eight games remaining.

The Caps got off to a very good start in this affair dominating the entire first frame. Alex Ovechkin scored his 30th goal of the season just 8:31 in after a great feed from Nicklas Backstrom from below the goal line. T.J. Oshie and Marcus Johansson made a couple of good passes on that power play to set it all up, with Jojo getting the 2nd assist. For the Gr8, this was his 12th straight season with over 30 goals and he becomes just the third player in NHL history to do that (former Capital Mike Gartner and some guy named Gretzky, you might’ve have heard of him). It was fitting that the goal came from his patented spot in the left wing circle on the power play, but this was not a one-timer, it was just a top shelf snap shot that Mike Smith (29 saves) had no chance on because he had to be deep in his net with #19 holding the puck behind the cage just before the great feed to Ovi.

Washington would lead the shot attempt board, 28-8, after period one, but mainly because of Smith and the Capitals inability to get any rebounds or a lot of traffic, it was only 1-0.

In the second period, the Capitals continued their domination and with 7:47 gone, Arizona’s Connor Murphy (-3) took a double minor for high sticking. The Caps would have possession in the offensive zone for nearly the entire four minutes, but once again Smith stood tall. That PK seemed to energize the Coyotes and like the Empire in Star Wars, they began striking back. Arizona’s Alex Goligoski had a glorious chance in the 38th minute to even things up for his club, but he missed the ocean from the beach on a shot just above the crease. Washington was VERY LUCKY there that #33 shot wide, but the Yotes did earn a power play on that sequence (Justin Williams for hooking). The Caps PK was very strong in that instance and Jay Beagle had a shorthanded breakaway right before the close of the period that he didn’t connect on, so this one went to the third frame with just one puck separating the two teams.

Shot attempts were still 56-27 for the Caps, but late in that second period Arizona began to close the gap.

Just like on Thursday against Columbus, the Capitals struggled to start the third period after dominating the first 40 minutes. Arizona would get a power play after a Beagle holding the stick penalty to prevent a scoring chance at 5:40, but Washington would kill it off. Still, Coach Barry Trotz’ squad was playing mostly perimeter hockey looking for the perfect play to extend their lead and that allowed the Coyotes to hang around. Luke Schenn, who is slow and one of the more chippier players in the league, took a roughing call midway through the period and Washington had their fourth power play of the night and a chance to give themselves a two goal cushion. That didn’t happen and they failed to generate many good looks, only an Ovechkin blast that missed the cage. In fact, the Caps didn’t have a single shot on net on that man advantage. That’s inexcusable with a one goal lead. You have to simplify, at that point, and get bodies and pucks to the net.

After the power play expired, the Capitals were caught flat flooted in the offensive zone and Anthony Duclair and Peter Holland raced by the entire Washington skating five for a breakaway on Holtby. Braden naturally did his job to stop the initial shot, but the Caps lollygagged their way back and allowed Duclair to pot the rebound to tie the game up. 29 seconds later the Coyotes had a chance to take the lead when Tom Wilson was given an extra roughing penalty for a scrum with Holland.

Arizona would get five shot attempts on that power play, including four on net. Their best chance came after a terrible turnover by Nicklas Backstrom, who instead of just clearing the puck on the right wing boards, tried to get fancy with a breakout pass up the middle of the ice and he was stripped of the biscuit by rookie Jakob Chychrun (son of former Flyer, Jeff). It was a lost focused moment by #19, something we don’t typically see from him. Luckily, the Holtbeast made a big save to bail out Nicky and keep things tied up.

The whole first 15 minutes of period three was pretty much a lack of focus stretch for Washington since they were outshot attempted, 17-8, by one of the worst teams in the league. That’s unacceptable in such an important game from a standings perspective!

Fortunately for the Caps, Dmitry Orlov made a great play coming out of the defensive zone and he sprung #26 down the right wing boards for a clear lane to Smith with just under five minutes left in regulation. Winnik skated in and made no mistake about hitting the twine to notch his 10th goal of the season. That tally shook the young Dave Tippett coached squad and just 32 seconds later Williams put a sweet shot over Smith’s shoulder and under the bar for a 3-1 lead.

Arizona then pulled the goalie and who else, Winnik, scored the empty net goal on a Smith Barney type of effort. Daniel tallied that ENG the old fashioned way, he earned it! It was a hard fought and gritty goal from the red line to the crease from a player who brings it every night. He’s been a great teammate and tireless worker since coming over at the trade deadline last season and that second tally ties his career high for goals in a season at 11. He was the well deserved number one star in this tilt, which included him getting interfered with chasing a loose puck that caused him to crash into the end boards and get shaken up. But #26, who eats rocks for breakfast, shook that off and kept working. He, along with Holtby, were the difference in the game.

Overall, the Caps out shot attempted Arizona, 69-46, but there wasn’t a ton of traffic on Smith in this one and as a result, there weren’t many rebound attempts. I especially didn’t like the first 15 minutes of period three. There was a lack of focus from Washington and there weren’t enough guys willing to lay it on the line and stick their nose into the thick of the Coyotes defense to get a dirty or greasy goal. In the playoffs, that is how you will have to score, the perimeter way leads to the golf course. So while the Caps were winning the statistic battle, from a hockey eye perspective, they weren’t playing the right way.

However, a guy like Winnik pretty much always plays the right way and he was the man on Saturday night in a much needed victory for the Caps. Fancy wasn’t going to get the Caps a win, it was going to take some hard work and honest hockey, and that’s what Daniel did to help turn a close game into a late laugher.

Pay that Man, too??!!

Notes: Shots on goal were 33-29 for Washington. Arizona had a 15-7 third period advantage…Holtby now has 39 wins and one more will give him three straight seasons with 40 victories, making him the 3rd goalie in NHL history to do so (Martin Brodeur and Evgeni Nabokov)…Orlov’s assist on Winnik’s GWG gives him a career high in assists (26) and points (32) in a season…Kevin Shattenkirk played well once again and had two assists…the Caps are 5-0-1 in their last six games…Washington lost the faceoff battle, 31-24, but #83 was 13-5…the Caps were 1 for 4 on the power play and four for four on the PK…the Capitals set a club record for home wins in a season (31). They only have two home games left (Rangers on 4/5 and Florida on 4/9). Washington hits the road for five straight tilts over eight days, starting in Minnesota on Tuesday, then Colorado on Wednesday, Arizona on Friday, Columbus on Sunday, and then ending in Toronto on Tuesday, April 4th.

Comments Off on Winnik’s Hard Work Leads Caps to a 4-1 Win Over Arizona

The Caps move to 4-0-2 in preseason with a 2-1 shootout victory over Boston.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Ovechkin Scores as Caps Beat Boston

Posted on 02 October 2015 by Ed Frankovic

TJ Oshie and Evgeny Kuznetsov scored in the shootout and Braden Holtby stopped both Bruins shooters to give the Caps a 2-1 victory on Friday night at the Verizon Center.

Holtby, who came on after Philipp Grubauer played the first period (6 saves on 7 shots), did not allow a single goal in 23 shots over the 45 minutes he played.

The Caps had a very sloppy and listless first period, but as the game went on they got stronger with Kuznetsov, Oshie, and Alex Ovechkin piling up scoring chances. It took a slick Kuzya pass to the Gr8 late in regulation for the Caps to finally get a biscuit past a Bruins goalie. Tuukka Rask played the first 40 minutes for the Beantown Boys and was absolutely stellar thwarting breakaways and many other grade A chances. He was a perfect 15 for 15 in the cage. Jeremy Smith was excellent as well, but he had little chance on the Ovechkin game tying goal.

The Gr8 continues to have the best shot in the league since Ovi has a fast release and can fire the puck from many different angles. Simply put, he is one of the greatest goal scorers to ever play in the National Hockey League.

There was a lot to like in this game for Washington besides the Ovechkin line and Holtby. Justin Williams was superb and had several quality chances. He had eight shot attempts while Ovechkin had 10 and Kuznetsov had eight. That’s a nice distribution in the top six.

Washington went 0 for 5 on the power play, but they moved the puck well and generated some great chances without their PP QB, Nicklas Backstrom (hip), in the lineup. I’d like to see a little more traffic on the opposing goaltender.

The Caps penalty kill was a perfect 4 for 4. The biggest key to the Capitals improving in this category will be to minimize the number of infractions they take. One way to do that is to have the puck more often and adding the likes of Oshie and Williams should do that.

The defense looked decent without Matt Niskanen and Brooks Orpik (wrist) in the lineup. Dmitry Orlov played well and appears to have locked up the #5D spot. Nate Schmidt had a bad giveaway on the lone Bruins goal (and John Carlson didn’t help him out by breaking up the ice early and leaving Loui Eriksson all alone in front of the net), but after that he was better. Orlov and Schmidt are both guys who can rush the puck up the ice which should help fill the void left by Mike Green’s departure. Orlov can also throw some sneaky good hits.

What I didn’t like were the four fights. Tom Wilson fought Kevan Miller twice, splitting the bouts. Wilson, who logged 1:37 of PK time in this game and didn’t look out of place, needs to be on the ice for Washington and not in the box. The only positive is he did fight a legit NHL D man. As for the Oshie-McQuaid fight, that was one that no one wanted to see. Oshie laid a clean hit on McQuaid behind the net and Torrey Krug took exception to it and started shoving #77. Then McQuaid came in from behind and the next thing you know TJ is in a fight where he’s in over his head. Coach Trotz gave him credit for standing up there, but as Comcast’s Alan May astutely pointed out afterwards in the post game show, either a teammate or a zebra needs to jump in there and save Oshie. Washington can’t have one of its’ star players fighting and potentially getting injured.

The slow starts are also something that plagued this team in last year’s playoffs and they need to correct that early on this season.

Overall, the best news was the Caps are just one game away from the regular season. Noone was injured and after Sunday’s 5 pm tilt with the New York Islanders at the Verizon Center, the regular season begins at home on Saturday, October 10th against the New Jersey Devils.

Notes: Derek Roy had a solid outing and appears to be a good bet to be a Capital in the home opener if he and the Caps can work out agreeable financial terms…Center Chandler Stephenson was decent, but at 21 years old, another season in Hershey makes the most sense for him…Carlson logged 30:05 to lead Caps defensemen while Ovechkin led the forwards with 23:39…the Caps out shot attempted Boston, 53-51, and won the face off battle, 33-31…Regulars who didn’t play on Friday that aren’t injured were Andrei Burakovsky, Jason Chimera,and Niskanen.

Comments Off on Ovechkin Scores as Caps Beat Boston

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Fehr Wins Game for Caps in OT

Posted on 19 November 2014 by Ed Frankovic

After a pointless weekend, the Washington Capitals desperately needed a win in Arizona on Tuesday night.

Eric Fehr delivered that for the Caps potting the rebound of a super hard and low shot by Brooks Orpik in overtime to give Washington a 2-1 victory over the Coyotes.

Good things happen when you get pucks and bodies to the net, and that is how the Capitals finally earned the W in this one to move to 8-7-3, which is good for 3rd place in a struggling Metropolitan Division.

Coach Barry Trotz often calls the NHL a shoot first league.

On Tuesday, Washington had 50 shot attempts, of which only 24 made it through on goal. It’s hard to win games when you aren’t getting shots on net, especially when you are facing a quality goalie in Mike Smith.

The lack of shots needs to change. Somehow this Caps team has to find a way to work harder, and also stop over passing the biscuit, and get more shots to the opponents cage. They also need to go to the front of the net, and as Alan May continually says on Comcast, STOP in front to screen the goalie and put yourself in position for a tip or a rebound. It’s not rocket science.

Doing that requires a mental toughness and willingness to work. Right now we aren’t seeing that consistently from all 12 forwards. There are too many guys playing the easy game, as evidenced by the horrible second period when the Capitals only had two shots on net.

Fortunately the Capitals are playing solid defense and received good goaltending from Braden Holtby (23 saves). The only goal allowed was yet another where the Caps were victimized puck watching in their own zone and that left Oliver Ekman-Larsson all alone to put the biscuit into pretty much a vacant cage early in period two.

This Capitals team right now is very inconsistent. Whether that is a product of the new system or simply the lack of willingness to work hard and pay the price to win by several guys remains to be seen.

But on Tuesday they did what they had to do, find a way to beat a not so good Phoenix club and halt Washington’s two game slide.

Next up is another struggling club, the Colorado Avalanche, at the Pepsi Center on Thursday night. The Avs do have some high end talent, so the Capitals need to be ready or they’ll be run out of Denver.

They also need to shoot the puck and crash the net against Colorado backup goalie Reto Berra, who will likely be in the cage with Semyon Varlamov out injured.

Notes: Jay Beagle scored the Caps first goal off of a sweet drop pass by Jason Chimera…faceoffs were 33-26, in favor of Arizona…the Caps power play continues to struggle and went 0 for 3, but at least they had chances, unlike Saturday in St. Louis. The Caps killed off all four Coyotes man advantage situations…Orpik led the Caps in ice time with 23:11 and was +2.

 

Comments Off on Fehr Wins Game for Caps in OT

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Next GM Most Important Decision in Caps Franchise History

Posted on 28 April 2014 by Ed Frankovic

The Washington Capitals have been in existence for 39 years and they still have not won a Stanley Cup.

With their team spiraling further away from winning Lord Stanley, Caps Owner Ted Leonsis and Team President Dick Patrick fired both General Manager George McPhee and Head Coach Adam Oates on Saturday.

Those moves were no surprise, especially if you read my blog from two weeks ago. The Capitals have a flawed and unbalanced roster that became even more exposed under some questionable coaching decisions this past season.

Simply put, these moves had to be made and Leonsis stated that the team needed new leadership and “a new set of eyes.”

The hiring of the next GM is critical to this franchise given that star players Alex Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom, who are both signed to long term contracts, are in the prime seasons of their career. McPhee and company were unable to put a quality team around those two players and as a result much criticism has fallen on them, especially the Gr8.

Some who cover the NHL have already tweeted or blogged that this is Ovechkin’s fault. When you make the money he makes, have won the MVP three times, aren’t of North American descent, and haven’t won a Stanley Cup yet, those things will happen. It’s an easy narrative for those who choose to be lazy and biased.

But those who’ve studied and watched this Washington team since 2008 know the real story. Fancy stats clearly show that this team’s puck possession statistics have steadily declined since 2009, after Sergei Fedorov left for Russia. The decline is a function of an eroding roster, particularly on defense, and poor coaching/system changes. None of those roster or system decisions were made by Ovechkin.

Hall of Famer Rod Langway used to always tell me that hockey starts from the goalie to the defense and then to the forwards. If your defense routinely can’t get the puck out of your own end, how are the forwards going to produce with any consistency at even strength? Washington’s overall blue line crew has gotten worse over the past several seasons.

Bottom line, as I wrote two weeks ago, the Caps have failed Ovechkin, not the other way around.

For those who still want to put a vast amount of blame on him I pose the following question:

If I gave you the choice of any other forward in the NHL in place of Ovechkin for the last three seasons, would the Capitals have won a Stanley Cup or even made the Finals?

That’s right, you could have Jonathan Toews, Ryan Getzlaf, Sidney Crosby, etc. but you lose Ovechkin in that move. Do you think the Capitals win a Stanley Cup doing that?

No way, not with the rest of that roster.

Hockey is a team sport. So blaming Ovechkin for the team’s decline is absolutely incorrect.

Now that’s not saying that the Gr8 can’t improve his game. Every player can always get better. NBA great Larry Bird used to spend every summer working on new moves, so if Bird thought he needed to improve, every player certainly should be trying to do so, as well.

Fortunately for Caps fans, the ownership, despite making it clear that these moves weren’t done solely for Ovechkin, get that the Gr8 is a special player. When I asked both Leonsis and Patrick about the pressure and abuse that Ovechkin takes, Patrick was quick to defend him and point out the nature of the NHL.

“Alex Ovechkin is a great, great hockey player,” Patrick said. “I wish we had two of him, then we wouldn’t even be here today, probably. All he wants to do is win. People are saying, ‘Well, you’ve got Alex Ovechkin. How come you haven’t won a Cup?’ It does take a team. It takes 20 guys. How can you be unhappy with what Alex Ovechkin has accomplished and continues to accomplish in the National Hockey League?”

Patrick is bang on and that is why it is so crucial to get a GM that really understands how to build a team. The “new set of eyes” needs to help alleviate the pressure on its two stars by bringing in better players, particularly on the blue line, and by adding leaders with winning experience.

As the great Jim Ignatowski once said on Taxi, “There is no substitute for experience!”

That brings me to my next point. The trend in sports is to seek out the next “hot” assistant and give him the keys to the camper. We see it with GM positions and head coaching openings many times in pro sports.

Jim Benning of Boston is a name that is on the top of the “next GM” list for many NHL clubs, according to people I’ve spoken with around the league. There are other hot assistants out there too like Ron Hextall, Jason Botterill, and Tim Burke.

But would hiring another hockey person with no GM experience be the right move here?

Hmmm…..

Sometimes bringing in a person that has performed in that role previously is the better choice, even if they’ve been fired. After all, Joe Torre and Bill Belichick were both fired but went on to win multiple championships with their new teams. Simply put, there is something to be said for learning from past mistakes.

So shouldn’t names like Mike Gillis, Neil Smith, and Craig Button garner attention? All have been a GM before and both Smith and Button have Stanley Cup winning experience, Smith as GM of the Rangers in 1994 and Button as the Director of Player Personnel with Dallas in 1999.

To me, Button is an intriguing option. He has ties to the organization from his late father Jack, who played a prominent role in the drafting and development of personnel in Washington from 1979 to 1996. Craig worked closely for years with Bob Gainey and Doug Armstrong in Dallas taking a team that was built around young players Mike Modano, Derian Hatcher, and Richard Matvichuck and transformed it into a Stanley Cup Champion. He understands the microscope Ovechkin and Backstrom are under and he has a successful track record in dealing with that scenario.

In addition, he took a flailing Calgary Flames team and re-built the defense on a club that eventually went to the Stanley Cup Finals in 2004. Then GM and Coach Darryl Sutter credited Craig for laying the groundwork for a squad that came ultra close to winning it all.

He currently covers the NHL for the NHL Network and TSN but he also pays close attention to the junior ranks and publishes his own draft board each spring on TSN’s website. His knowledge of current pros and amateurs is extensive. With the Stars, he drafted both Jarome Iginla and Brenden Morrow. As someone in the business recently told me, “He’s hard working, dedicated, and has an incredible passion for the game.”

Given his excellent people skills, I’d have to imagine he is on Leonsis and Patrick’s current list to interivew.

As for that process, Leonsis made it clear that they were not going to conduct a search where information is going to be made publicly available. Certainly details will get exposed as the media scouts out Kettler IcePlex, but the Caps are pretty good at keeping things secretive.

Leonsis stated this was going to be a thorough search while putting no timetable on its conclusion.

Given the importance of this decision, which I believe is the most critical one in franchise history, the owner and Team President must do what they need to do to make sure they get this GM selection correct.

Comments (2)

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Season Saving Win For Caps?

Posted on 08 March 2014 by Ed Frankovic

For over 40 minutes on Saturday night, it sure looked like the Washington Capitals were headed for a fourth straight loss and about to sustain a serious blow to their playoff chances.

The Caps looked listless for the third straight contest and couldn’t find a way to get a goal, extending their scoreless streak to over 100 minutes. Making things worse was they were playing a strong defensive team in Phoenix with one of the top goalies in the NHL in Mike Smith.

But suddenly, a team that wasn’t working very hard to overcome some lineup holes, started doing the little things right, like getting pucks and bodies to the net.

Karl Alzner scored a seeing eye goal from the blueline that only finds the back of the cage because Troy Brouwer and Jay Beagle went to the front of the net and took their defenders with them. Keith Yandle managed to screen his own keeper with 10:15 to go and suddenly the Caps and the Verizon Center had life for the first time since before Dmitry Orlov’s awful hit last Sunday.

Joel Ward, Jason Chimera, and Brooks Laich then outworked the Coyotes down low and #25 found Brooksie all alone in front of the cage and he put it by Smith to tie things up just 32 seconds later.

The Caps instantly became a new team. Orlov then drew a penalty to put Washington on the power play and when Troy Brouwer potted the rebound of a great Nicklas Backstrom shot, the Capitals grabbed a 3-2 lead.

Then, instead of sitting back, Washington became an even more energized squad and dominated the last five minutes of regulation to salt away a huge victory.

Jaroslav Halak notched 31 saves to earn his first victory in his Caps debut and he can thank referee Tim Peel for a quick whistle that disallowed a Phoenix goal in period one. But that’s the breaks of the game, a Backstrom shot that appeared to be a goal last Sunday against Philly didn’t count and hurt Washington in that one, so it looks like things eventually evened up.

Halak was shaky early on and probably wanted at least one of the two goals back, but his save on Antoine Vermette in the third period on a one on one was absolutely a must and a key reason why the Capitals were able to overcome the two goal deficit. I’ve been saying all season long that goaltending is not the major issue for the Caps and I stand by it. Halak was good, but defensive mistakes and lapses in focus continue to plague this Washington club and is the primary reason they are on the outside looking in at the postseason, right now.

But that’s a story for another day, the Capitals are alive and still in the hunt after a huge rally over a good Phoenix team.

They started skating and doing the simple things and were rewarded.

The question now is can they keep this energy level up on Monday when they start a critical home and home with the Pittsburgh Penguins?

Washington gained some much needed positive vibes and confidence tonight that they need to carry into Monday’s tilt.

They will also likely get newly signed Evgeny Kuznetsov (2010 Caps 1st round draft choice) in the lineup for the game against the Pens. “Kuzy” will wear #92 and likely skate on the second line. He arrived in DC today and signed his entry level contract (two years) with the Capitals this afternoon. He will burn up that first year in less than 20 games and then will have another season left, but General Manager George McPhee called that aspect of the deal, “worth it.”

It’s hard to argue that because the Caps need skilled offensive players and Kuznetsov (just 21 years old), who carried the Russian squad to World Juniors Gold in 2011, has the potential to really improve the offense. But coming to North America and playing on the smaller rinks will be an adjustment. He is not “a savior” for the Caps season, but make no mistake about it, this club needs forward help with Laich playing through serious pain and Mikhail Grabovski still on the shelf due to a wonky ankle.

The road is not easy for the Caps as they have the hardest schedule in the NHL in their remaining 17 games, but rallying tonight and inking Kuzentsov at least gives them a fighting chance to pull off a seventh straight playoffs appearance.

Notes: Washington once again lost the face off battle for the fifth straight contest, 33-26. Losing draws makes it very difficult to win the puck possession battle. The Capitals will need to improve in this area if they are going to get on a run and make the playoffs…John Carlson led the Caps in ice time at 23:50 and he had an assist on the game winning tally.

 

 

Comments Off on Season Saving Win For Caps?

Tags: , , ,

Torrey Smith: “We weren’t on same page”

Posted on 22 December 2013 by WNSTV

Comments Off on Torrey Smith: “We weren’t on same page”