How did Ravens safeties stack up to rest of NFL in 2018?

February 26, 2019 | Luke Jones

The Ravens returned to the playoffs for the first time since 2014, but where did their players stack up across the NFL in 2018?

Whether it’s discussing the Pro Bowl or determining postseason awards, media and fans spend much time debating where players rank at each position, but few watch every player on every team extensively enough to form any type of an authoritative opinion.

Truthfully, how many times did you watch the offensive line of the Detroit Lions this season? What about the Oakland Raiders linebackers or the San Francisco 49ers cornerbacks?

That’s why I appreciate the grading efforts of Pro Football Focus while acknowledging these rankings shouldn’t be viewed as infallible or the gospel of evaluation. I can respect the exhaustive effort to grade players across the league when most of us watch only one team or one division on any kind of a consistent basis.

Below is a look at where Ravens safeties ranked at their positions followed by the positional outlook going into 2019:

Offensive linemen
Linebackers
Tight ends
Defensive linemen
Running backs
Cornerbacks
Wide receivers

Eric Weddle
2018 defensive snap count (including postseason): 1,016
PFF ranking: 10th among safeties
Skinny: The 34-year-old Pro Bowl safety was the on-field mastermind for a top-ranked unit, but he recorded just three pass breakups and no interceptions after a combined 21 breakups and 10 picks in his previous two seasons. That statistical decline coincides with a $9.25 million cap number for 2019.

Tony Jefferson
2018 defensive snap count (including postseason): 863
PFF ranking: 35th among safeties
Skinny: Jefferson rebounded from an underwhelming first year in Baltimore as defensive coordinator Wink Martindale more consistently played him closer to the line of scrimmage, playing to his strengths. The 27-year-old still doesn’t excel in coverage despite one of the highest cap figures on the 2019 roster.

Anthony Levine
2018 defensive snap count (including postseason): 280
PFF ranking: 71st among safeties
Skinny: Levine isn’t a true safety, cornerback, or linebacker, but his versatility brings more value in today’s game with defenses trying to account for pass-happy opponents while not becoming too vulnerable against the run. His presence in the dime package makes the defense more unpredictable.

Chuck Clark
2018 defensive snap count (including postseason): 252
PFF ranking: n/a
Skinny: The second-year reserve filled in capably for an injured Jefferson, making two starts and registering an interception in the Week 14 loss at Kansas City. Clark also occasionally served as a bigger nickel and dime option in addition to his dependable special-teams contributions.

2019 positional outlook

This past season marked the first time since 2012 that the Ravens started the same two safeties from the previous year, but an abundance of resources were exhausted to get to that point after a number of failed draft picks and free-agent signings since Super Bowl XLVII. General manager Eric DeCosta must determine whether Weddle’s cerebral presence makes up for his physical decline enough to warrant a $6.5 million base salary for the final season of his four-year deal. Contract restructures the last two years have also made Jefferson’s $12.657 million cap number for 2019 problematic, but cutting him would leave more than $9 million in dead money, making it likely he stays put for another year. After suffering a season-ending broken arm last summer, 2018 sixth-round safety DeShon Elliott carries potential, but it would be ambitious to view him as an immediate starting option if Weddle were to be released. Even if the veteran starting duo remains intact for 2019, the Ravens should be targeting a play-making safety with range in April’s draft such as Delaware’s Nasir Adderley.